Friday, 8 June 2012

M&S to take on high street banks



UK retailer Marks & Spencer is to launch M&S Bank, rolling out 50 branches over the next two years. A 50:50 joint venture with HSBC with current (checking) accounts to be launched in the Autumn and mortgages 'later'. This gives M&S a head start on Tesco who has had to delay the launch of its current accounts until 2013. Ironically these two 'new' retail-based banks are frequently adjacent neighbours on retail parks across the UK, where the big four high street banks are rarely to be found, so it maybe that they find themselves competing with each other rather than taking on the big boys.

Of course neither Tesco or M&S are really new entrants into Financial Services both have been offering products for some time. M&S first started offering FS products in 1985 and has the successful &more credit card, but this will be the first time it is calling itself a bank.

The timing of M&S's announcement is good. Not only does it come after a set of disappointing results for its retail business, it comes at a time when the high street banks are both unpopular and mistrusted. This can only be good for M&S with it's slightly older, more affluent and loyal customer base.

With the opening hours of the branches being the same as the retail stores and the initial prototypes of the branches looking very retail, calm and sophisticated and, as they are keen to point out, with fresh flowers, this will, to coin their phrase, not be any bank it will be a Marks & Spencer Bank.

But will it really shake up competition in the banking sector? Fifty branches over two years is not that many. Given that Virgin already has 75 branches (since its acquisition of the 'good' Northern Rock), Yorkshire Building Society has 227, Handelsbanken (the least well known, but the bank with the highest customer satisfaction) has over 100 branches and whoever (Co-op, NBNK or a flotation) acquires the Verde branches, that Lloyds Banking Group has to dispose of, will have 632 branches, just like Metro Bank with its 12 branches, this is not going to be an immediate threat to the high street banks.

Certainly in the short term it will not make a significant difference to the M&S share price. However it has every chance of being a success that will build over time. M&S has decided not to take the route that Tesco is finding to be so challenging of going it alone without a bank behind it. M&S by partnering with HSBC is able to stick to what it does best - retailing while HSBC can focus on managing the banking operations. The CEO of M&S Bank, Colin Kersley, was with HSBC for 30 years, so he knows the bank extremely well. The UK CEO of HSBC is Joe Garner, who spent his early career with Dixons. The two organisations have worked together for a number of years (HSBC acquired M&S Money) and understand where each is coming from, so this has to be a significant advantage.

Overall from a consumer perspective this move by M&S is to be welcomed. Whilst Joe Garner is quoted as saying that this is 'the most significant innovation that HSBC has carried out since First Direct' only time will tell whether he is right.

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