Monday, 23 July 2012

Is Co-op really a contender with Lloyds' Verde?


Lloyds and the Co-op?


What Co-op is acquiring is the 632 branches that Lloyds has had to sell, with all the Lloyds TSB Bank branches in Scotland, the Cheltenham & Gloucester branches across the UK and the rest made up of other Lloyds TSB branches. They will also get the CEO of Verde, Paul Pester, his team and the management and the staff for those branches. Lloyds Banking Group will provide and manage the systems for the foreseeable future.

What does this mean? Starting with the customers there is no guarantee that the customers for those branches will move to Co-op. Whilst Lloyds Banking Group can't market to those customers to transfer their business back to Lloyds, customers are not obligated to stay and could easily move their accounts to another bank, including Lloyds. Evidence of this was seen when Santander bought the RBS branches that had to be sold. Customers did not like the idea of being sold and many have moved their accounts before the transaction went through. As a consequence the value of the deal to Santander has gone down significantly.

Looking at the leadership and staff of the new bank - it is the old leadership and staff. Many of these people will have been at either Lloyds or TSB for many, many years, so there is no guarantee that they won't continue to deliver banking the way that they always have done. Indeed the systems will enforce the processes and incentives of the existing Lloyds Banking Group. Verde, or TSB as it will be branded, could be just a mini-me Lloyds Bank, without the scale to compete.

Having Verde run on the Lloyds' existing systems for the foreseeable future has two distinct disadvantages for the Co-op.

Firstly, the acquisition benefits of rationalising systems and processes that usually underpin any M&A deal are not going to be realised. Instead the Co-op will end up running their Co-op and Britannia branches using the Co-op systems and processes (assuming the completion of the migration of the Britannia systems onto the Co-op platform) and the TSB branches using the Verde systems and processes. Many of the synergies that the bank would have hoped to realise from their 1000 branches will not be achieved until they can move onto a single platform. Due to the complexity and the cost of the Verde systems the migration has been kicked into the long grass. The Co-op will have all the overheads of having to support three brands in the market, Co-operative, Britannia and now TSB. Not only is there expense in running multiple brands, but significant scope for confusion amongst customers. Rather than having a new 1000 branch contender there will be three brands fighting to compete for customers all with less scale than the Big 5.

Secondly Antonio Horta-Osorio, the CEO of Lloyds Banking Group, recognises that the systems underpinning Lloyds are simply not good enough to compete in today's retail banking market. This is why he is spending hundreds of millions of pounds on the 'Simplification' programme to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the banking systems to enable them to compete in the mutlichannel, always available, digital world. However those improvements will not be applied to the Verde systems. To use an Olympics analogy it is like your older brother giving you his old Nikes while he is upgrading to the far superior ones. Who would you expect to win in those circumstances?

With the size and scale of Lloyds Banking Group there is far more scope for investment in making the retail bank fit and efficient than there is for the Co-op. Not only that, when the Co-op wants to make upgrades to their TSB systems they will be dependent on Lloyds Banking Group to make those changes for them. Whilst Lloyds can be recognised for its history and experience of  excellence in retail banking it is not well known for its provision of IT services and certainly not as a commercial provider of IT services. The Co-op may find itself held back by the speed and agility of not only its systems but also its IT services provider.

The celebrations of the Co-op creating a contender of scale to compete against the Big 5 banks may be a little premature.