Showing posts with label Barclaycard. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Barclaycard. Show all posts

Friday, 29 May 2015

Why banks should see ring fencing as an opportunity

Banks in the UK should be seeing ring-fencing as an opportunity rather than trying to wriggle out of or diluting the effects of the legislation.

Ring-fencing, the separation of the retail business from the non-retail business is estimated to cost each of the major banks between £1.5 and £2.5bn to set up and a subsequent additional annual charge of between £1.7bn and £4.4bn to run. Each of the UK banks are looking differently at what will be inside the ring fence and what will be outside. For instance Lloyds Banking Group, which is largely UK and retail banking focused, is looking to have most of the existing group within the ring fence and only the corporate bank outside of it. On the other hand Barclays is looking to put the minimum, the UK retail bank inside, while businesses like Barclaycard and the corporate and investment bank would be kept outside the ring fence. HSBC appears to be looking at a similar model to Barclays with the UK Retail Bank – effectively HSBC, First Direct and M&S Bank inside the ring fence with the rest outside with the distinct possibility that the Head Office of the Group would be relocated to Hong Kong.

However the UK based banks are seeing ring-fencing very much as an unavoidable problem that is both unnecessary and expensive.

There is a different, more positive point of view and that is the ring-fencing activity should be seen as an opportunity to fundamentally re-think both how the bank should operate and make those major investments that it has never been quite the right time to implement. Ring-fencing should be seen as a means of investing in the business in order to both reduce the cost base and enable the bank to better compete in the UK market.

Implementing a culture that results in market leadership

Since 2008 there has been a lot spoken and written about changing the culture of banking, moving from the Gordon Gecko ‘Greed is good’ investment banking culture  and back to one where the role of bankers is to serve their customers. The recent Libor and Forex fines handed out by regulators suggests there is little evidence of the change in culture being anything other than talk.

With the physical separation of retail from investment banking there is a one off opportunity to actually design and implement the different cultural model that each of these businesses should adopt. The reality is that there is no one culture that fits retail, corporate, private and investment banking. As Treacy and Wiersema wrote in their seminal work on the Value Disciplines it is not possible for organisations to be the leaders in more than one of the three values disciplines – operations effectiveness, customer intimacy and product leadership. Excelling at each one of those value disciplines requires a different cultural model. The current size and complexity of banks has led to a blended culture that has inevitably led to compromise and resulted in excellence at none of them. Ring-fencing provides the opportunity to put this right.

Use the opportunity to replace legacy IT with architecture driven solutions

Much has been written about the failure of the large banks to step up to the challenge from the digital natives due to the complex legacy IT systems. Ring-fencing provides the opportunity to step back, produce and implement the architecture required to deliver the front to back digital experience that customers, both retail and corporate, are demanding. Under the label of ring-fencing this is the opportunity to ditch the legacy systems that were designed for a simpler banking world and that have been twisted and forced to support a multi-segmented banking business. This is the right time to replace them with architecturally driven, agile, cloud-based, channel agnostic solutions that will enable the banks to deliver the experience and services that customers are demanding rather than the ones that the banks are forcing customers to take. The experience that a retail customer is demanding is quite different from the corporate or investment banking customer requires. After all if the banks are going to have to spend between £1.5bn and £2.5bn why not spend this on something better than today rather than just splitting and duplicating today’s systems across those businesses within and outside the ring fence?  

A chance to significantly drive down cost while improving customer experience

Today’s banks have a real challenge with costs. With the additional capital required to be held, the low interest rates and the increased regulation there is no doubt that the cost base for banks need to be dramatically reduced and changed. Ring-fencing provides the opportunity to look at whatthe cost bases of the businesses inside and outside the ring fence should be. This includes looking at which parts of the cost base the bank actually needs to own and which it can outsource to those better able to deliver the service on a more cost effective basis. Outsourcing can not only reduce the costs it can also allow the bank to focus its key resources on the strategic priorities such as digital.  Ring-fencing provides the opportunity to look at the processes from the beginning to the end and to decide which parts of the processes the bank actually needs to own, which parts of the process would be suitable for the application of Robotic Process Automation and which parts of the processes are no longer relevant. This should enable the bank to significantly improve the overall customer experience as well as drive down cost. This is also a chance to strongly embrace the use of analytics and deploy Next Best Action tools. By executing all of these activities cost can, without doubt, be significantly reduced while exponentially improving the customer experience. This means that not only should the additional cost of operating the bank in a post ring-fencing world be reduced significantly from the estimated £1.7-4.4bn annual charge but the banks that get this right will be far better positioned for whatever the world chooses to throw at them.

Ring-fencing is an opportunity to be welcomed

For banks that see the glass half full (rather than half empty) when it comes to ring-fencing who embrace the opportunity to fundamentally re-architect and re-launch their businesses they will emerge from ring-fencing far stronger, far more agile and far more profitable than those banks who resent the regulation and try to do the minimum to comply with it.

Friday, 16 May 2014

RBS forced to sell Citizens ending the most successful UK retail banking foray into US market

British businesses don’t have a great track record in breaking into the US retail market. You only have to look at the disastrous foray that the Marks & Spencer acquisition of Brooks Brothers was, Tesco’s humiliating and expensive attempt with the Fresh & Easy brand and, most recently, the failure of Yo Sushi! to realise how difficult it is for firms with strong brands in their domestic markets to make it across the pond.

The retail banking track record is no better with Barclays, Lloyds and Natwest all quitting the US in the late 1980s and 1990s. Losses from the acquisition of Crocker drove Midland Bank into the arms of HSBC. Even HSBC has not been immune to the problem with the disastrous acquisition of subprime Household continuing to hurt the bank to this day.

It is quite ironic then that RBSG is being forced to exit the one reasonably successful move into retail and commercial banking that British banks have made in the US. Whilst Fred Goodwin, the former CEO of RBSG, has been criticised for much of the way that he ran the global banking group (particularly paying over the odds for ABN Amro just as the wholesale markets were closing down) his strategy for building a presence in the US retail and commercial banking sector should be heralded as one his smarter moves.

Rather than trying to take on the large US retail banks where they were, at that time, competing aggressively with each other in New York, California, Texas and Florida, Goodwin decided to build his beachhead in the Mid-Atlantic by the acquisition of Citizens Financial Group. A series of small but strategically significant acquisitions followed that expanded it into New England and the Midwest. Citizens is now the 15th largest commercial banking organisation in the US. Whilst there have been challenges including writedowns following the acquisition of Charter One and recent issues with the way that capital is planned, overall Citizens is a highly capitalised and profitable bank. Yes its capital is under deployed but that is addressable. Indeed its reputation with its customers is far better than RBS’ in its own domestic market.

It is a great shame then for RBSG that due to having to take state intervention and becoming largely nationalised, primarily due to the acquisition of ABN Amro and the disastrous business in Ireland, that RBSG is being forced by the EU to dispose of its ownership of Citizens by the end of 2016.

As the first step of moving towards this in January 2014 Citizens sold off 103 branches in the Chicago area to US Bancorp.

 It has been announced that the next step will be to float or sell 20-25% of its share of Citizens. A flotation is more likely as there have been few signs of interest from potential buyers. However for Canadian, Japanese or Spanish banks that want to significantly grow their presence particularly in the Midwest and given that it is a forced sale it could be an interesting opportunity.

The flotation will help to rebuild its balance sheet, but the sale is what is really needed as that could release more than $3bn of capital, which would help RBSG reduce the government holding in the bank.

This is all a sad ending to what could have been had RBSG scaled back its ambition to be global investment bank.

As a footnote, British banks should not give up on being able to build a presence in the US retail and commercial banking market. RBSG has shown that it can be done. Barclays is having success with its Barclaycard US operation building scale to take on the other cards providers, however this is a monoline not a full service retail banking offering.

The British banks can also look to the Spanish banks, Santander and BBVA which with respectively the acquisition of Sovereign Bank and Compass Bank, are demonstrating that it is possible for Europeans banks to build a presence in the US retail banking market. It takes time, patience and recognition that whilst both the US and European markets have the words ‘retail banking’ in their names that they are quite different.