Showing posts with label Halifax. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Halifax. Show all posts

Tuesday, 20 March 2018

Will GDPR inhibit or enable Open Banking?

Image result for "customer apathy"
GDPR is not the biggest threat to open banking, customer apathy is a far greater one. Banks and Fintechs have been pouring money into getting ready for open-banking, creating open APIs and new services and offerings for customers. However if there is one lesson that the seven-day switching service has taught us it is that the majority of customers are simply not interested in banking and see all banks as the same. Most customers would like to spend the absolute minimum amount of time thinking about their finances and see banking as a means to an end not the end itself. The volumes for seven day switching have been disappointing with an average of 75,228 per month in 2017. The expectation that there would be a mass move away from existing primary current account providers has not happened.

Even when customers have switched, it hasn’t been to either the neobanks (Monzo, Atom, Starling) or the challengers (Metro Bank, Clydesdale Bank, Yorkshire Bank, etc). With the exception of Nationwide Building Society, the net beneficiaries have been the large, global banks – First Direct (HSBC), Santander, TSB (Sabadell) and Halifax (Lloyds Banking Group). The neobanks are becoming secondary banks for the majority of their customers not the customer’s primary bank.

If seven-day switching hasn’t got customers excited about banking, will the offer of open banking be enough to get customers spending more with their existing banks or switching their primary banking relationship away from their current provider? If so, which banks are likely to be the winners?

Open Banking is intended to create more competition in the banking industry and to encourage better services and more innovation to improve the customer banking experience.

One way of improving the experience is  to provide a single place where a customer can see all of their banks accounts regardless of which bank provides them. This is not a new idea. Yodlee, the best known player in the aggregator market, has been around for over 17 years providing services to over 1,000 financial institutions and fintech providers. Account aggregation, which sounds like a good idea, has not taken off in the mass market. Apart from the customer apathy described above, the screen-scraping technique deployed by many aggregator tools involves the customer breaking the terms and conditions that they had agreed with their banks. This is where GDPR, Open Banking and PSD2 (which use open APIs) jointly provide a regulatory framework to give consumers the knowledge, should they wish to take up such services, that they are legally protected.

GDPR is about putting consumers back in control of how their data is used. GDPR from a customer’s perspective is a pre-requisite for open banking as it will give them the confidence that their personal data will only be used for the specific purposes that they have had to explicitly agree to when signing up for the service.

Account aggregation is not the only new service that banks, fintechs and non-banks are beginning to offer to customers. Real-time spending analysis, the ability to split restaurant bills and lower cost foreign transactions are among the services that both existing and neo-banks are offering.

A question that the banks must answer is whether the current open banking offerings are providing an experience that is sufficiently differentiated from the competition that it will make customers actively switch to them.

Neobanks being built using cloud first, modern technologies have advantages in both complying with GDPR and offering new services as a result of open banking. They have had been able to build from the start a single view of the customer in real time using open APIs and microservices. However, they lack scale in terms of both the numbers of customers and the depth of resources.

The existing big five banks have all the advantages of the size of their customer base and IT budgets. However they are hampered by the complexity of the legacy infrastructures, customer data is spread across multiple legacy systems designed for batch-processing makes building a real-time view of a customer’s relationship with the bank a significant challenge. This is why a number of the major banks have either elected to work with Fintech firms to help them address this or have designed new digital banks using modern technology.

For banks and non-banks (since the legislation was drawn up to encourage challengers from other sectors such as telcos, retailers and fintechs) GDPR increases the potential financial and reputational risks of entering the open banking market. While most people know little about the detail of GDPR almost everyone seems to know about the fines of up to 4% of global revenues for a breach of the regulation. The regulation goes live on 25th May 2018 and no organisation knows how strictly it will be enforced and certainly don’t want to be the test case for the first fines.

Given the risk of fines and the cost of meeting regulation, the revenue upside of entering the open banking need to be significant. Providing an aggregator service or a breakdown of expenditure in real time are good customer experiences but don’t directly bring in additional revenue as the neobanks are finding. Open banking is of course about more than just providing aggregation and PFM (Personal Financial Management) and the revenue growth is forecast to come from the provision of additional financial and non-financial services. All of the neobanks have realised that offering current accounts alone is not a profitable business. To be successful they need to be able to offer other services and are positioning themselves as marketplaces. One of the most successful organisations operating as a marketplace has been Moneysupermarket, but even they are finding that competition is driving down their margins and the barriers to entry (helped by the intervention of regulators) has significantly impacted their profitability.

A key criteria to be a successful marketplace is to have scale – amazon, ebay and Ariba (in the b2b world) demonstrate this. As open banking becomes a reality then the winners will also be the ones that have the scale. For the moment that advantage lies with the incumbent banks.

The success of open banking will neither be enabled or inhibited by GDPR. The success of open banking in the retail segment will be measured by the level of switching activity significantly rising.  This will only happen by providing an offering that so engages the customer that it overcomes the disinterest that most customers have about banking.

Friday, 3 October 2014

The FCA is wrong to focus on account portability

The news that the FCA is to explore the move to full account portability as part of a review of current/checking account switching is disappointing as the FCA appears to be rushing to a solution without having really understood why customers are not switching their account providers at the levels that politicians and consumer lobbyists would like to see. The reason that these parties wish to see higher levels of switching is that they see this as an indicator of competition in the current account market which is dominated by the big five banks – Lloyds, Barclays, RBS, HSBC and Santander.

Customer switching has gone up by only 19% since 7 day switching was introduced

The FCA have been triggered into action by their disappointment at the low increase in the level of switching following the introduction of seven business day current account switching service introduced in October 2013. Despite the investment of $750m by the large banks in creating this guaranteed switching service levels of customer switching has gone up by only 19%.

The large banks have been the beneficiaries of switching

The irony is that the biggest beneficiaries of the account switching services have been Halifax (part of Lloyds Banking Group), Santander (one of the world’s largest banks), Nationwide Building Society and TSB (a Lloyds clone and still partially owned by the bank). With the exception of Nationwide, the account switching service has done little to change the market share of the major banks and even Nationwide has hardly changed the percentage.

The parallels between mobile phone numbers and account numbers are not valid

However for the FCA to jump to the conclusion that this is down to customers being reluctant to change their bank account number and therefore account portability will change this is both bizarre and illogical. Parallels are often made with the mobile phone industry where phone number portability has encouraged customers to switch between providers. However the use of phone numbers and bank account numbers are quite different. Whereas in order for telephone customers to be able to keep in contact with the hundreds and even thousands of people who have their number programmed into their phones keeping their mobile number when changing suppliers is essential the same cannot be said for bank account numbers.

Most bank customers have not memorised their bank account numbers. Once access to internet and mobile banking is set up a customer very rarely needs to know that number. When paying bills, transferring money, checking their balances, setting up or changing direct debits or standing orders there is no need for customers to know their bank account number. With the seven day switching services direct debits are transferred and guaranteed that if a problem occurs that the customer will be refunded for any charges occurred during the transfer process. With the increasing availability of P2P (Person to Person) mobile banking applications such as Pingit customers only need to know the mobile phone number of the person that they are transferring the money to (which is very likely to be stored in their phone) and don’t need to know the bank account details of the person that they are wanting to transfer money to. It is a fallacy to say that the reason people are not changing their bank accounts is because they don’t want to change their bank account number.

Customer interest in switching accounts is far lower than politicians and lobbyists

One of the primary reasons that is quoted despite the Seven Day Switching Service making it far easier for customers to switch current accounts is what politicians refer to as ‘customer apathy or inertia’. The reason that customers aren’t bothered is because for most customers banking really isn’t that interesting (until it goes wrong or they have a financial crisis), that the actual amount that they would save by switching from one bank to another is so minimal that it isn’t worth the effort and that they see one bank account much the same as another. To most customers banking services are a commodity and a largely undifferentiated one. They have better things to do with their lives than monitor whether one bank account is better than another.

There are significant numbers of providers of current accounts

The fact that the main beneficiaries of account switching have been the larger players is not because there is not a lot of choice in the market. Examples of organisations offering personal bank accounts include Nationwide Building Society, Tesco Bank, Marks & Spencer Bank, Metro Bank, Co-op Bank, Yorkshire Bank, Clydesdale Bank, Bank of Ireland (via the Post Office) and Handelsbanken.

The reason that Halifax, Santander, Nationwide, TSB and Metro Bank (though on a lot lower scale than the other four) have been successful in getting current account customers to switch to them is because of their attractive propositions whether it be paying interest on current account balances, discounts on utilities and other bills, convenience of branches or even offering dog biscuits. The fact that some of the most attractive propositions have come from the larger banks is because for most banks most personal current accounts are either loss leaders or have very low margins and therefore to be profitable in the current account market you need scale. That is very difficult and takes a lot of time to build from scratch as Metro Bank is finding.

Many of the so-called challenger banks e.g. Aldermore, Shawbrook, OneSavings Bank and Handelsbanken are not even attempting to engage in the personal current account market because of how unattractive it is financially. They would rather focus on the mortgage market or SME banking where the margins are higher and the cost to enter the market are far lower. As Virgin Money comes to the market it is based on the profits from mortgages and credit cards that the value will be attributed not current accounts.

The FCA is not focusing on the real issue

If the FCA is really interested in seeing greater competition in the current account market then rather than investigating a solution to a problem that doesn’t exist (customer only don’t switch because they don’t want to change their bank account number) then they should look at how to make it more attractive for the existing sub Big Five and new players to engage in the market with customer friendly banking propositions. It is only when there is significant differentiation between bank accounts in customers’ minds that switching volumes will become significant.

Wednesday, 28 May 2014

New NAB CEO faces challenge of what to do with Yorkshire and Clydesdale Banks


With Cameron Clyne leaving National Australia to spend more time with his family, incoming Group CEO, Andrew Thorburn, will have to face the perennial question of what to do with the bank’s UK businesses. For many years Yorkshire Bank and Clydesdale Bank have been seen as albatrosses hanging around the neck of the incumbent Group CEO of National Australia. With Nab’s focus on growing in their domestic market and Asia the two banks have long been seen as non-strategic.

During the financial crisis Nab had to invest nearly £1.5bn of capital into the business to shore up the balance sheet. There have been challenges with non performing loans as well as redress for misselling of PPI to add to the woes. As part of a plan to improve the performance of the business there has been a significant cost cutting exercise that resulted in the removal of 1,400 jobs and the closure of 29 banking centres. There has also been a withdrawal from London and the south of England.
However for many years both banks have been starved of any significant investment to improve them and to make them better able to compete in the UK market. It is not since the Brit John Stewart was Group CEO and fellow Brit Lynne Peacock was running the UK operations that any significant effort was put into innovation and growing the businesses in the UK. Indeed large parts of the strategy for the UK banks set out by Stewart and Peacock were reversed during the cost cutting exercise. (Recent news that Clydesdale Bank is to issue Britain’s first plastic £5 note hardly counts as innovation).
Nab in Melbourne have for a long time been very open about the fact that Yorkshire Bank and Clydesdale Bank are seen as non-strategic. The market has been sounded out for interest in acquiring the business. At one point it was rumoured that Santander was interested in acquiring the business but no deal has emerged. A key on-going challenge for the Nab Group CEO has been that there has been a significant gap between the value that the UK operations are held on the balance sheet and the price potential acquirers are prepared to pay. This situation has deteriorated even further since the crisis in 2008 with both bank valuations dropping and the interest in acquiring banks disappearing. For Nab, either no  Group CEO wanted to take that write off on their watch or the Board wouldn’t let him.
There is no doubt that there has been and continues to be a lot of dissatisfaction from analysts and investors about the financial performance of Nab in its local domestic market. It is seen as the laggard of the Four Pillars. The challenge for Andrew Thorburn is to turn around that perception. Whilst the UK operations are definitely not the highest priority in terms of fixing the business they are seen both as a distraction and requiring significant capital that could be better deployed elsewhere.
So as Andrew Thorburn starts his role as CEO in August 2014, will he do something to resolve this issue and what are his options for the UK operations?
The ideal outcome for the new CEO would be to sell the UK operations and minimise the write off. The question though is who would want to buy them?
On paper Yorkshire Bank and Clydesdale Bank could be challenger banks. They both have strong brands with loyal customers. The Yorkshire brand stretches way beyond the county boundaries. Clydesdale is seen very much as a Scottish bank and one that has managed to maintain its reputation far better than either Royal Bank of Scotland or HBoS, its two main rivals. This could make it attractive to Private Equity firms, for instance JC Flowers might wish to merge it with its OneSavings Bank. It could also be attractive to other Private Equity firms looking to establish a foothold in the UK retail banking market. However the timing for One Savings Bank is not good as they have already announced that they are to float and that is where their focus in the short term will be.
The challenge for anyone evaluating Yorkshire and Clydesdale is, apart from their customer base, what is there of value to acquire? Between the Yorkshire and Clydesdale they have 322 branches, a very similar number to the branches that Williams & Glyn (the challenger bank being created from the forced disposal RBS has to make) will have. However, as is becoming increasingly apparent to both established and challenger banks, the use of branches by customers is declining and therefore the value of having an extensive network of branches is reducing. As both RBS and Lloyds found out finding buyers for their branches was not easy with both, respectively, Santander and Co-op withdrawing their offers after long protracted negotiations. The additional challenge with the Yorkshire and Clydesdale branches is that significant investment by the buyer would be required to bring the branches up to  a standard customers expect today due to the lack of investment by Nab over the last few years.
If a new entrant was looking to acquire the Nab UK operations and they wanted to initially use the Nab IT platforms then if they wish to be competitive they would need to invest very heavily over the medium term on new platforms, as the Nab platforms are old and in need of retiring.
With a cost income ratio of 76% there is a lot of efficiency gains to be driven out by the right owner, but the question is the level of investment to achieve this and over what time period.
Given the level of investment that any new entrant would need to make in order to use the UK operations as a platform for competing in the UK retail banking market, the price that they would be prepared to offer is highly unlikely to meet the amount sitting on the Nab balance sheet.
Given Nab’s situation it is easy to understand why a couple of years ago Santander were rumoured to be interested in acquiring the UK operations. Santander has its own platform, Partnenon, and has a track record of being able to migrate bank accounts onto its systems – Abbey National, Alliance & Leicester and Bradford & Bingley. The challenge for Nab is that Santander is a distress purchaser and never knowingly overpays.
If Nab can’t sell Yorkshire and Clydesdale at an acceptable price then what about a flotation? Timing is a real challenge here as there has never been a time when more banks are coming onto the market. TSB, Aldermore, OneSavings Bank,William & Glyn, Virgin Money, Metro and Shawbrook have all announced intentions to come to the market over the next eighteen months. Investors are spoilt for choice. Along with the recent disappointing flotations (Saga, JustEat. AO, etc), albeit in other sectors, there will be a downward pressure on prices and consequently the amount of capital that will be raised.
Another option is to do nothing and let the two brands continue to operate as they are today, continue to reduce costs and improve performance with minimal investment and allow the business to slowly decline as customers move away to competitors when they are attracted by better offers.
There is no immediate need for Andrew Thorburn to make a decision about the future of the UK operations particularly given the uncertainty with the Scottish Referendum occurring in September 2014. The UK operations operate under a Scottish banking licence and a ‘Yes’ vote could create a long period of uncertainty and have a significant impact on the value of the UK operations.
However as a new CEO there is a grace period during which there is an opportunity as the new broom to look with fresh eyes at all the problems. It is an opportunity to announce write offs, set the bar and expectations low and then over-perform. Thorburn should take full advantage of this initial period of goodwill to be quite clear what his plan is for Yorkshire and Clydesdale to end the uncertainty for customers, colleagues and investors.

Thursday, 24 April 2014

The challenges facing the next RBS CIO

With the news that Mike Errington, CIO of RBSG, is retiring the bank will be looking for a replacement. The new CIO will have an overflowing inbox, so for those considering taking on the role what are some of the challenges that he or she will have to face?

The immediate on-going work is to ensure the stability of the existing systems. Having had a number of serious, customer-impacting outages over the last few years (including a problem with Ulster Bank ATMs on the day this was written), the work of applying patches to and building resilience into both hardware and software needs to continue. RBS is not the only bank that in earlier times avoided doing maintenance as a way of saving costs and subsequently is feeling the impact of doing that in terms of reliability of systems.

The second tactical exercise is the simplification of the IT infrastructure. However this is far easier said than done as the IT systems have evolved over many decades, creating great complexity and the number of people who understand the older systems and how they interrelate is rapidly declining both as the result of retirement and cost cutting within the bank. Simplification is about retiring and rationalising systems and infrastructure. Given the complexity that exists this is alike disarming a booby-trapped Second World War bomb requiring both high levels of skills and nerves of steel.

Both of these steps are akin to re-arranging the deckchairs on the Titanic, given the ages of the systems. There is no doubt that there has been significant underinvestment in IT since way before the RBS/Natwest integration. Whoever is the new CIO they should use the opportunity of as part of their taking the role to negotiate a commitment to a wholesale replacement of the core retail banking system as the likes of CBA (Commonwealth Bank of Australia), Nationwide Building Society and Deutsche Bank have carried out. However this would involve spending measured in the low to mid billions of pounds and a programme taking 3-5 years to execute. This is where making such an essential change becomes particularly difficult specifically for RBS as RBS is not just any bank, it is a state-owned bank. Such is the political pressure to see the bank returned profitably to the private sector and within the first couple of years of the next government i.e. almost certainly by the end of 2018, that it is highly unlikely that the funding for such a major investment programme will get approval from the key shareholder. However that is what both the CIO and the CEO should be looking for if RBS is to once again become a truly competitive UK bank.

There are however other major transformation programmes that the new CIO will have to pick up, drive and deliver.

Having negotiated an extension of the deadline to the end of 2016 for the disposal of the 308 branches that RBS was forced by the EU to sell as a result of receiving state aid, creating a separate clone of the RBS systems for the new Williams & Glyn’s bank to run on is another top priority for the new CIO. This is not dissimilar to the exercise that Lloyds Banking Group had to perform to create the platform for TSB to run on. However the Lloyds Banking Group platforms were in a far better state than the RBS systems benefitting from coming on the back of creating a single set of systems for the Lloyds TSB/HBoS merger. Even having that advantage for Lloyds Banking Group creating the separate TSB platform was not simple or easy with the eventual cost being in the order of £2bn. Delivering the William and Glyn’s separation to the 2016 deadline will be a major achievement.

This is not the only separation programme that the CIO will have to oversee. The IPO of the Citizens business in the US in Q4 2014 and the complete disposal by the end of 2016 will also need to be executed. This will entail the disengaging of Citizens from the Group systems.

In addition there is the question of what to do with Ulster Bank. The preferred option is to dispose of it by selling it to one of the challenger Irish banks e.g. Permanent TSB, Danske Bank. If that is to go ahead then the new CIO will have to look at the separation of Ulster Bank from the Group systems and supporting the clone until it is integrated into the buyers' systems.

One of the core strategies of RBSG is to scale back the investment bank, reducing costs to be aligned with the smaller bank and to return the bank to be more focused on the UK and supporting UK businesses. This will inevitably require changes to the investment banking platforms as businesses are closed or sold off. To achieve the reduction in costs and the required flexibility as volume drops will almost inevitably mean looking at further outsourcing of platforms and operations to third parties.

On top of the RBSG specific initiatives the new CIO will also face the plethora of transformation programmes and projects that will need to be implemented as a result of regulatory changes. One of the core ones will be the implementation of ring-fencing once that is fully defined. This will mean a significant change in the governance of RBSG and there is a question as to whether the role of Group CIO can persist under the new rules, requiring in a significant restructuring of Group Operations.

All of this will need to be delivered whilst digital, mobile and the use of data analytics for both competitive advantage and risk management continue to move at pace in an increasingly competitive banking market.

The new RBS CIO will need to face up to this hugely challenging environment all within the constraints of  a bank operating very much in the public spotlight, with the need to rebuild trust and the financial constraints imposed by  having the government as the largest shareholder. Only the bravest should apply.

 

 

 

Sunday, 2 March 2014

Why 0% BT cards and teaser rates have no role to play in customer centric banks

The announcement by Ross McEwan, RBSG CEO, that RBS and Natwest will remove teaser rates from savings products and scrap 0% interest credit card deals is another step on the road to recovery for RBSG. RBSG is not the first banking group to identify the unfairness for existing loyal customers when these types of offers are made to new customers. It is however the first of the Big Five UK banks to make this stand.

Banks that scrap short term special introductory rates on products for customers, while they position this as for the benefit of existing customers are not simply being altruistic. They are doing this because they know that by adopting a customer- rather than a product-centric approach to running their bank there can be a significant improvement in the long term profitability of their businesses.

Over the past few years there has been a significant price war in the 0% Balance Transfer (BT) credit card market. As one competitor has extended the length of the 0% interest period by one month the next has extended it a further month. Six months ago the market thought that no one would go further than a 28 month (2 years three months) period but it has now got to the point where Barclaycard is offering a 31 month interest free period. It could be argued that this is really good news for customers as fierce competition is driving better deals for consumers. However what is interesting to note is that the top three places in the BT card table are all being offered by one of the Big Four banks - Barclays, HSBC and Lloyds Banking Group. With their very large deposit and current account bases they have large amounts of low cost money to lend which they, it could be said, are using to keep other competitors out, particularly the smaller players who have to resort to the wholesale markets to fund these loans. By extending the periods so long it makes it too expensive for smaller players to compete.

But why are the big banks so keen to lend customers money apparently free for so long? There is of course an up front a fee based on a percentage of the balance being paid - in the case of Barclaycard it is 3.5% which is reduced to 2.99% by a refund (nothing like simplicity!). What this gives the banks offering these products is short term fees, which, with interest rates being so low, fee income is particularly important for short term profits. None of the banks that offers these products has a competitive APR (Annual Percentage Rate) for additional transactions. The banks also know that these are customers who do not pay off their credit cards every month otherwise they would not have got a balance to transfer in the first place. Until recent regulation came into place forcing banks to pay off the most expensive debt first (in this case the new transactions not the 0% balance) this was almost a licence for banks to make money as every payment customers made was used to pay off the 0% balance meaning every new tranaction that was rolled over the month end would continue to rack up high interest rate charges. Even with the change in legislation, whilst these cards are positioned as a way for customers to pay off their debts, the banks concerned are certainly hopeful that their customers will continue to use their credit cards accruing the bank interchange and other fees for every transaction as well as building a large balance for when the 0% interest rate expires.

The problem with BT customers is that they have had the nous to transfer the balance for a 0% period. This means that they are likely to be price conscious and therefore when the next good deal comes along or when their free period ends some of them are likely to be off again to the next bank or credit card company offering a good deal. Others are likely to rack up debts that they cannot afford and go into arrears. For a bank that is looking to develop long term mutually profitable relationships with its customers the majority of these are the wrong type of customers. These are not customers who are looking to or have the money to take out other products from the bank. Banks who offer these types of products are, on the whole, product-centric. Banks who the only credit card they offer is a Balance Transfer is not customer centric.

Moving onto the removal of teaser rates from savings products. The primary reason banks offer short term attractive rates is to build volumes of deposits in order to be able to lend the money out to other customers in the form of a loan or mortgage. It is also a way of raising the brand of the bank by getting it into the best price tables, on the first screen of the aggregator websites such as Moneysupermarket.com and getting it mentioned by Money Savings Expert Martin Lewis. However being successful at doing this can have at least two downsides. Firstly the bank can end up with more low or no margin deposits than it has the demand to lend which leads to losses and secondly it attracts price sensitive customers aka, price tarts. The problem with price tarts, as the name implies, is that as soon as the introductory rate expires they will be off taking their money and giving it to the next bank that has decided to get offer a teaser rate. Just like the with Balance Transfer Card these are not the types of customers that a long term profitable bank should be built upon. With both product strategies it is a case of quantity being sacrificed for quality and taking a product perspective over a customer one.

However  it would be wrong to think that there are no downsides to a strategy that strictly adheres to the principle that existing customers should never be disadvantaged over new customers. In 2001 Nationwide Building Society, under the previous CEO, introduced a policy that all its mortgage offers would be made available to both new and existing customers. It resulted in retaining a higher proportion of its mortgage customers than other banks but with significantly impacted profitability. Nationwide has moved away from that purist implementation to a more pragmatic approach. It doesn't seek to be in the top of the price tables for its products but rather it seeks out customers that are looking for a long term relationship with the building society as its Save to Buy offering for first time buyers illustrates. The result has been a very significant growth in profitable business.

Ross McEwen sees the turnaround of RBSG as taking at least another five years. The announcements of the changes to the retail product strategy will potentially have a negative short term effect for the retail bank, but in terms of moving RBSG towards being a customer centred bank these are sensible steps as long as the shareholders and other interested parties have the patience to see them through. What he has recognised is that 0% cards and teaser rates have no role to play in a customer centric bank.

Wednesday, 17 November 2010

Burger King Banking - is it a Whopper?

Vernon W. Hill II, the founder of Metro Bank, the first new high street bank in the UK for over 100 years, likens growing Metro Bank to growing a Burger King franchise. He should know as he owns a large Burger King franchise in the US. He also successfully grew Commerce Bank in the United States to 500 'stores'. What he means by the similarity of growing a Burger King franchise is that every 'store' looks identical, operates identically, has the same level of service and operates as a retail outlet. In Metro's case some of the gimmicks are giving away free pens (Barclays has been quietly doing that for some time in their branches), free dog biscuits and cash counting machines built to look like one arm bandits.

None of this is particularly new either in the US, the UK or the rest of the world. We have seen over the last decade or so banks attempting to become more like retail outlets whether it is the Abbey experiment with branches co-located with Costa Coffee outlets, which lent heavily on the experience of Washington Mutual with its co-located branches with Starbucks or the Australian branches with their offer of waxing your board while you are doing your banking. We've also seen banks recruiting senior executives from the retail sector to drive that retailing mindset into the branches. As tax payers no one should be allowed to forget the impact of having a retailer running Halifax Bank of Scotland had on that particular bank.

The point is that on the surface it may seem that a bank branch is just like any other retailer, but it only at the surface that that analogy works. When you go into a burger king to go to buy a standard product that is entirely disposable, highly commoditised and which you own for only a very short time. For a product such as this a bright, open plan store with little or no privacy is entirely appropriate. However opening a current account or a loan or a mortgage is nothing like a burger. Buying these types of products is a  long term, for many a life time, acquisition, intensely private (sharing how much you earn or are worth continues to be one of societies taboos that simply isn't going away) and are not quick purchases. So when you sit down in an open plan office, where the people on the street outside walking past can see the screen that the banker is operating as he types in your salary or looks at your overdraft, and the person at the desk next to you is ear-wigging on your conversation don't forget to ask whether your value added account comes with fries!