Showing posts with label M&S Bank. Show all posts
Showing posts with label M&S Bank. Show all posts

Friday, 29 May 2015

Why banks should see ring fencing as an opportunity

Banks in the UK should be seeing ring-fencing as an opportunity rather than trying to wriggle out of or diluting the effects of the legislation.

Ring-fencing, the separation of the retail business from the non-retail business is estimated to cost each of the major banks between £1.5 and £2.5bn to set up and a subsequent additional annual charge of between £1.7bn and £4.4bn to run. Each of the UK banks are looking differently at what will be inside the ring fence and what will be outside. For instance Lloyds Banking Group, which is largely UK and retail banking focused, is looking to have most of the existing group within the ring fence and only the corporate bank outside of it. On the other hand Barclays is looking to put the minimum, the UK retail bank inside, while businesses like Barclaycard and the corporate and investment bank would be kept outside the ring fence. HSBC appears to be looking at a similar model to Barclays with the UK Retail Bank – effectively HSBC, First Direct and M&S Bank inside the ring fence with the rest outside with the distinct possibility that the Head Office of the Group would be relocated to Hong Kong.

However the UK based banks are seeing ring-fencing very much as an unavoidable problem that is both unnecessary and expensive.

There is a different, more positive point of view and that is the ring-fencing activity should be seen as an opportunity to fundamentally re-think both how the bank should operate and make those major investments that it has never been quite the right time to implement. Ring-fencing should be seen as a means of investing in the business in order to both reduce the cost base and enable the bank to better compete in the UK market.

Implementing a culture that results in market leadership

Since 2008 there has been a lot spoken and written about changing the culture of banking, moving from the Gordon Gecko ‘Greed is good’ investment banking culture  and back to one where the role of bankers is to serve their customers. The recent Libor and Forex fines handed out by regulators suggests there is little evidence of the change in culture being anything other than talk.

With the physical separation of retail from investment banking there is a one off opportunity to actually design and implement the different cultural model that each of these businesses should adopt. The reality is that there is no one culture that fits retail, corporate, private and investment banking. As Treacy and Wiersema wrote in their seminal work on the Value Disciplines it is not possible for organisations to be the leaders in more than one of the three values disciplines – operations effectiveness, customer intimacy and product leadership. Excelling at each one of those value disciplines requires a different cultural model. The current size and complexity of banks has led to a blended culture that has inevitably led to compromise and resulted in excellence at none of them. Ring-fencing provides the opportunity to put this right.

Use the opportunity to replace legacy IT with architecture driven solutions

Much has been written about the failure of the large banks to step up to the challenge from the digital natives due to the complex legacy IT systems. Ring-fencing provides the opportunity to step back, produce and implement the architecture required to deliver the front to back digital experience that customers, both retail and corporate, are demanding. Under the label of ring-fencing this is the opportunity to ditch the legacy systems that were designed for a simpler banking world and that have been twisted and forced to support a multi-segmented banking business. This is the right time to replace them with architecturally driven, agile, cloud-based, channel agnostic solutions that will enable the banks to deliver the experience and services that customers are demanding rather than the ones that the banks are forcing customers to take. The experience that a retail customer is demanding is quite different from the corporate or investment banking customer requires. After all if the banks are going to have to spend between £1.5bn and £2.5bn why not spend this on something better than today rather than just splitting and duplicating today’s systems across those businesses within and outside the ring fence?  

A chance to significantly drive down cost while improving customer experience

Today’s banks have a real challenge with costs. With the additional capital required to be held, the low interest rates and the increased regulation there is no doubt that the cost base for banks need to be dramatically reduced and changed. Ring-fencing provides the opportunity to look at whatthe cost bases of the businesses inside and outside the ring fence should be. This includes looking at which parts of the cost base the bank actually needs to own and which it can outsource to those better able to deliver the service on a more cost effective basis. Outsourcing can not only reduce the costs it can also allow the bank to focus its key resources on the strategic priorities such as digital.  Ring-fencing provides the opportunity to look at the processes from the beginning to the end and to decide which parts of the processes the bank actually needs to own, which parts of the process would be suitable for the application of Robotic Process Automation and which parts of the processes are no longer relevant. This should enable the bank to significantly improve the overall customer experience as well as drive down cost. This is also a chance to strongly embrace the use of analytics and deploy Next Best Action tools. By executing all of these activities cost can, without doubt, be significantly reduced while exponentially improving the customer experience. This means that not only should the additional cost of operating the bank in a post ring-fencing world be reduced significantly from the estimated £1.7-4.4bn annual charge but the banks that get this right will be far better positioned for whatever the world chooses to throw at them.

Ring-fencing is an opportunity to be welcomed

For banks that see the glass half full (rather than half empty) when it comes to ring-fencing who embrace the opportunity to fundamentally re-architect and re-launch their businesses they will emerge from ring-fencing far stronger, far more agile and far more profitable than those banks who resent the regulation and try to do the minimum to comply with it.

Thursday, 12 June 2014

Tesco Bank launches a current account - finally!

The news that Tesco Bank has finally launched its current/checking account six years after its split from RBS was announce must come as a great relief to Benny Higgins, CEO, and the rest of the team at Tesco Bank. Like expectant fathers they have been pacing the corridors of the maternity ward far longer than they would have liked. The delays have been numerous but principally down to getting over the regulatory hurdles and, more recently, ensuring that the IT systems fully work the way that they are meant to before being unleashed on real customers. Delaying the launch of the current account until the systems were thoroughly tested, while it was frustrating for those anxious to see Tesco Bank becoming a real challenger to the sector, should be recognised as absolutely the right decision for the CEO to take. The embarrassment and reputational damage caused to banks such as RBS and National Australia from having serious outages in their core banking systems far outweighs the benefits of launching earlier.

The announced current account is paying 3% on balances and only charging a monthly account fee of £5 if less than £750 is paid into the account. This is a competitive offer. There are added advantages for Tesco customers who will also receive loyalty Clubcard Points on all spending using the Tesco debit card.

Marks & Spencer beat Tesco out with a current account, having both free and fee-charging versions of their accounts. As with Tesco there will be benefits of being both a customer of M&S and its bank in terms of rewards. There will be some overlap between customers but the big difference is that Marks & Spencer Bank is owned by HSBC and therefore cannot really be seen as a challenger bank.

The launch of the current account by Tesco Bank should represent a real challenge to the big five banks (Barclays, Lloyds, HSBC, RBS and Santander). As an aside, Santander likes to position itself as a challenger but being owned by one of the largest banking groups in the world, coming from the consolidation of building societies (Abbey National, Alliance & Leicester, Bradford & Bingley being the main ones) and with a less than perfect reputation for the service it provides it quite rightly deserves to be clumped in with the other big 4 banks as being just another legacy bank.

There are many reasons why Tesco Bank should be seen as a real challenge to the established players. For starters it is not a small bank – it already has over 6 million customers using its insurance and lending products. All of these customers are potential customers for their current account offering. It also already has a large physical distribution network through its supermarkets. As they are available to savers today customers will be able to make deposits in 300 stores. However this account has been designed to be opened online and customer support will be available on the phone. The bank being designed for digital differentiates it from the likes of TSB, Metro Bank, Virgin Money and Williams & Glyn, which have all come from a traditional branch centric design.

Not only has Tesco Bank been designed from the start with digital in mind, Tesco also has many years experience of running large scale digital operations through its own website as well as operations like Tesco Mobile. This gives it a much better chance of delivering a reliable good customer experience than other challenger banks, particularly the small scale contenders such as Metro Bank, Aldermore and Atom.

Tesco Bank also has the added advantage that through its Clubcard programme it not only has vast amounts of data on both its existing and potential customers but it also has years and years of experience of using that data to drive business. Unlike the new start ups and the established banks so-called ‘Big’ data is not a new topic for Tesco. This should give it significant advantages given its customer insight in terms of providing customised propositions to its customers.

Tesco Bank is also not weighed down by legacy. They don’t have the reputational problems from the mis-selling of PPI and the high levels of complaints which the Big Five banks have. They can position themselves as truly a new entrant. While TSB and Williams & Glyn may have the liability for the past retained by their parents (Lloyds and RSB respectively) many of the executives who made the decisions to sell PPI, set the aggressive targets and the staff who delivered them are working for these ‘challenger’ banks.

They are also not weighed down by legacy systems unlike the Big Five banks, those spawned from the Big Five (TSB and Williams & Glyn) and those challenger banks who have been created by the acquisition of former building societies such as One Savings Bank (Kent Reliance Building Society) and Virgin Money (Northern Rock). While it may have taken Tesco Bank longer to get to market with their current account it is being delivered on (at least relatively) modern systems.

What the launch of Tesco Bank’s current account means is that there are now two sizeable challenger banks that are not tainted with the legacy of the financial crisis and that are serving their customers using modern technology platforms designed to work in the digital mobile world – Nationwide and Tesco.

Does this mean that the Big Five banks are quaking in their boots worried about their future? Clearly any bank executive should be aware of and taking into account what the competition is doing. The reality though is that for most customers banking is not that interesting, it is a commodity not worth spending a lot of time thinking about and that despite Seven Day Switching making it easier, they have better things to do with their time than switch bank accounts. This means that there will not be a flood of customers leaving the Big Five banks to sign up with Tesco or Nationwide.

The launch of the Tesco Bank current account is to be welcomed as a new force in the retail banking market, but no one should think that this is going to bring about a seismic change to who customers bank with.

Friday, 7 March 2014

This is not just any fee-free current account, this is a Marks & Spencer fee-free current account

Marks & Spencer have announced that they are to launch a fee-free current account. The account will have no overdraft fees, the first £100 of which is interest free and a (relatively) low interest rate for overdrafts of 15.9%.  For those who transfer their main banking account to M&S they will receive a £100 gift card. A key attraction for M&S customers will be the loyalty scheme where points are earned for debit card spending in M&S stores and online. It also passes the critical requirement of allowing customers to bank online as well as on the phone or in store.

A key differentiating feature is not charging a transaction fee for ATM cash withdrawals made with the debit card abroad. For both Metro Bank and Nationwide the lack of transactions fees when abroad attracted customers; however that feature was withdrawn and both now do charge fees for transactions abroad.

On the face of it this is a competitive offering and should be attractive to to both M&S and non-M&S customers alike.

This is not a new market entry for Marks & Spencer (they launched their fee-charging account with a similar loyalty scheme in September 2012) but rather a change of their positioning re. free banking. M&S claims that their fee-charging account has been successful with M&S customers, so this does raise some questions as to why they should launch a fee-free product and at this time.

One of the dangers to M&S of having similar current account products with one offering a fee and one not is self-cannibalisation. Will customers of the current fee charging account be happy to see that whilst they are paying a fee other customers are not paying one for what seems a remarkably similar product? Will some of those customers look to switch to the fee free product? M&S is allowing these Premium Customers to switch their accounts to the free one and will even give them a £100 gift card if they switch their main account to M&S.

Of course this is not just a current account this is an M&S current account. Except it isn't. It is actually an HSBC current account as it is HSBC that is not only behind M&S Bank but owns 50% of the bank. While M&S may position itself as being good for current account competition in the UK market, with HSBC behind it the impact on the market share of the Big Four banks will be none.

Another question that M&S will, hopefully, have considered is what types of customers will be attracted to this account? With no mandatory minimum monthly amount that needs to be paid into the account, customers may only open this account for the loyalty scheme and maintain minimum balances or, as Nationwide found with its credit card, only use the card for cash withdrawals abroad. For a current account to be profitable for a bank it is important for it to become the primary customer account where the customers salary is paid into and the mortgage and other core regular payments come out of it. Without high current account balances or large overdraft fees (which the account does not charge) current accounts for banks are loss leaders. For M&S they need to demonstrably see the customers of their current accounts spend significantly more in M&S stores and online than non-current account customers for the bank to be deemed a success.

For those championing an end to so-called free banking, the launch in September 2012 by M&S of fee-charging current accounts was seen as setting an example to others that would help to accelerate the end of so-called free banking. For those championing an end of free banking, this recent news from M&S that they are launching fee-free accounts will be seen as a step backwards delaying the end of free banking further.

So why have M&S made this announcement at this time? There are already successful non-Big Four banks, particularly Nationwide, Metro Bank and Santander (with their 1-2-3 account) as well as HSBC-owned First Direct who have been taking advantage of the delays and the problems that other challenger banks have been facing in getting their current account propositions right. Now however with Tesco having announced that it will (finally) launch its current account offering this summer and Virgin Money expected to launch its basic bank account later this year, M&S is clearly keen to get to the potential switchers ahead of the others.

But why have M&S decided to launch fee free products given the issues and risks discussed above? It can only because of the need for volume. Running a profitable current account business with all the investment in infrastructure such as contact centres and IT, in personnel and marketing requires scale. Clearly M&S, despite their protestations, haven't achieved this with their fee charging accounts and they see this as an opportunity to build a bigger customer base which will reduce the marginal cost of running a bank.

It will only be some months after the launch of the both the new M&S fee-free accounts and the Tesco current account that it will be clear whether this move was good news for M&S' beleaguered shareholders and customers or not.