Showing posts with label Metro Bank. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Metro Bank. Show all posts

Tuesday, 28 August 2012

Is free banking holding back competition?



The UK Parliament review of the banking sector following a summer of scandals across the sector has, once again, raised the question of whether the end of the British system of so-called 'free banking' would introduce further competition into the sector. There are many who argue that free banking is a major barrier to entry for new competitors in the sector. However there is no evidence that this is the case.

In Australia, where there is the greatest transparency the cost of banking, where almost every transaction attracts a fee, the market is dominated by the so-called Four Pillars - ANZ, Westpac, Nab and Commonwealth Bank. There are smaller players such as Bendigo Bank, but despite the lack of free banking the split of the market is almost identical to that of the UK.

A number of new entrants already operate, or have announced that they will, exclusively non-free banking. Handelsbanken, the most successful of the new entrants with over 100 branches and the highest customer satisfaction of the UK banks (see http://www.itsafinancialworld.net/2012/01/customers-love-banks-who-charge-them.html), does not offer free banking. Marks & Spencer have announced that their current account will charge fees and even Virgin Money, the consumers' champion, has announced that its current account will charge a 'small fee'.

So whilst there is increasing competition in the UK retail banking sector why are the new entrants not able to make any more than a small dent in the share of the big five banks (Barclays, Lloyds Banking Group, RBS, HSBC and Santander)? One of the key reasons is the economies of scale required to be profitable in retail banking.

Owning and operating the infrastructure (the ability to process standing orders, direct debits, transfer money, access to ATMs etc) required to process billions of transactions reliably requires very large amounts of capital. Whilst the recent issues that RBS recently had with processing transactions, the UK banking infrastructure is amongst the most reliable in the world. Returning to Australia, the banks there have had far more problems with their payments infrastructure than the UK, despite having far lower transaction volumes.

New entrants today are able to use the Big Five's infrastructure. Whilst they may argue that the cost they pay is unfair and has little transparency as to the basis of  the charge, it is certainly a lot cheaper than building their own. In itself these costs are not the reason that holds back their success against the Big Five.

The biggest scale advantage that the encumbents have is  operating capital. This was most recently illustrated by the competition for the Verde branches that Lloyds Banking Group had been forced by the EU to dispose of following the state bail-out after the acquisition of HBoS. Whilst there are a not insignificant number of players who would like to enter or grow their footprint in the UK banking market such as JC Flowers, Virgin, Metro Bank and NBNK, they either weren't able to or were unwilling to raise the amount of capital required to become a significant player in the market. This situation has become further exacerbated since 2008 with capital being even harder and more expensive to find. To make the situation worse the amount of capital required to be held has been raised higher following the banking crisis. Here the established banks have a distinct adavantage as the requirement for capital is lower for them than for new entrants to the market. This is clearly a major barrier to entry.

Another significant barrier to entry for new entrants is the increased scruitny and additional regulation as a result of the banking crisis. This means that it takes longer and is far more difficult for any new entrant to get a banking licence and to get its executives approved to run a bank. This was one of the major hurdles that has held up the launch of Tesco Bank.

It is very convenient for politicians to blame the lack of competition for the Big 5 on free banking, however those politicians need to reflect on their own role in making it more difficult for new competition. The UK government wants to have a safer banking sector and in so desiring and by its actions has made it more difficult for new entrants.

Friday, 8 June 2012

M&S to take on high street banks



UK retailer Marks & Spencer is to launch M&S Bank, rolling out 50 branches over the next two years. A 50:50 joint venture with HSBC with current (checking) accounts to be launched in the Autumn and mortgages 'later'. This gives M&S a head start on Tesco who has had to delay the launch of its current accounts until 2013. Ironically these two 'new' retail-based banks are frequently adjacent neighbours on retail parks across the UK, where the big four high street banks are rarely to be found, so it maybe that they find themselves competing with each other rather than taking on the big boys.

Of course neither Tesco or M&S are really new entrants into Financial Services both have been offering products for some time. M&S first started offering FS products in 1985 and has the successful &more credit card, but this will be the first time it is calling itself a bank.

The timing of M&S's announcement is good. Not only does it come after a set of disappointing results for its retail business, it comes at a time when the high street banks are both unpopular and mistrusted. This can only be good for M&S with it's slightly older, more affluent and loyal customer base.

With the opening hours of the branches being the same as the retail stores and the initial prototypes of the branches looking very retail, calm and sophisticated and, as they are keen to point out, with fresh flowers, this will, to coin their phrase, not be any bank it will be a Marks & Spencer Bank.

But will it really shake up competition in the banking sector? Fifty branches over two years is not that many. Given that Virgin already has 75 branches (since its acquisition of the 'good' Northern Rock), Yorkshire Building Society has 227, Handelsbanken (the least well known, but the bank with the highest customer satisfaction) has over 100 branches and whoever (Co-op, NBNK or a flotation) acquires the Verde branches, that Lloyds Banking Group has to dispose of, will have 632 branches, just like Metro Bank with its 12 branches, this is not going to be an immediate threat to the high street banks.

Certainly in the short term it will not make a significant difference to the M&S share price. However it has every chance of being a success that will build over time. M&S has decided not to take the route that Tesco is finding to be so challenging of going it alone without a bank behind it. M&S by partnering with HSBC is able to stick to what it does best - retailing while HSBC can focus on managing the banking operations. The CEO of M&S Bank, Colin Kersley, was with HSBC for 30 years, so he knows the bank extremely well. The UK CEO of HSBC is Joe Garner, who spent his early career with Dixons. The two organisations have worked together for a number of years (HSBC acquired M&S Money) and understand where each is coming from, so this has to be a significant advantage.

Overall from a consumer perspective this move by M&S is to be welcomed. Whilst Joe Garner is quoted as saying that this is 'the most significant innovation that HSBC has carried out since First Direct' only time will tell whether he is right.

Tuesday, 1 May 2012

NAB withdraws to the north - the end of innovation?



The announcement by National Australia Bank (NAB) that they are to close 29 of their business lending centres in the south-east of England and withdraw back to their northern roots, abandoning 80,000 customers, marks the end of an experiment initially started by John Stewart, then CEO of NAB, and more recently Lynne Peacock, until last year CEO of NAB in the UK.

John Stewart and Lynne Peacock worked together for many years at the Woolwich Building Society, where they were responsible for launching the UK's first flexible mortgage, the Open Plan mortgage, combining a savings account with a mortgage account, offsetting savings interest against mortgage interest. Ironically the Open Plan account was based on Australian flexible mortgages. Such was the success of the Open Plan account that Barclays decided to acquire The Woolwich and centre their mortgage business around their acquisition.

John Stewart was seen as an entrepreneur,leading Financial Services industry development and was subsequently hired by NAB to lead the business in Melbourne. He brought Lynne Peakock along, initially in Melbourne and then to lead the UK business consisting of Clydesdale Bank and Yorkshire Bank.

Once again, looking at how he could make a small player in a crowded market stand out from the crowd, he and Lynne Peacock came up with a strategy to take the strong Yorkshire Bank brand down to the sout-east and take on the Big 4 banks in their traditional territory. They came up with an entrepreneurial model where banks managers were allowed to operate like a franchise, to be directly rewarded for the performance of their branches, or Business Lending Centres, to be able to make lending decisions with less referral to the centre and therefore quicker decisions for customers. Their Business Lending Centres look like airline lounges, customers could use them to conduct their own business when in town, creating a very different customer experience. They even went so far as to organise 'speed-dating' for buinesses, whereby SMEs could meet other SMEs in order to do business with each other introduced by NAB. At the time  NAB was, once again, seen as leading the way in terms of a new banking model, of a new customer experience and indicating where the banking industry needed to go. The model was successful with the lending book growing at above market rates.

Many of the ideas that he and Lynne Peacock came up with have been emulated by other banks such as Handelsbanken (see http://www.itsafinancialworld.net/2012/02/who-said-branch-banking-was-dead.html , http://www.itsafinancialworld.net/2011/06/forget-virgin-money-or-metro-bank.html ), where the bank manager is master of his own business. NBNK in describing the type of banking they want to launch also describes something that is very similar to the NAB model. Metro Bank has gone some of the way towards this as has Virgin Money.

The reason that this has not worked for NAB is twofold. Firstly the focus was on commercial property lending. Since even before 2008 the commercial property market was overheating and finally burst, but like HBoS, NAB continued to lend and has, as a result, got a disproportionate amount of bad loans. Undoubtedly one of the reasons why the book grew so fast was because of the franchise model where the managers were paid in direct relation to the loans they made, which encouraged lending and discouraged caution. The second reason is that whilst NAB provided an excellent customer experience the customers were not prepared to pay for that. This is something that many banks face in a heavily commoditised market where there is the perception of 'free banking'.

In many ways it is a great shame (not least for all the people who will lose their jobs), that what NAB set out to do has failed. Certainly a number of the players, such as JC Flowers and NBNK, who have stated that they want to enter the UK banking market should consider whether acquiring the UK southern assets of NAB should be an option, rather than acquiring all of NAB UK.

Wednesday, 17 November 2010

Burger King Banking - is it a Whopper?

Vernon W. Hill II, the founder of Metro Bank, the first new high street bank in the UK for over 100 years, likens growing Metro Bank to growing a Burger King franchise. He should know as he owns a large Burger King franchise in the US. He also successfully grew Commerce Bank in the United States to 500 'stores'. What he means by the similarity of growing a Burger King franchise is that every 'store' looks identical, operates identically, has the same level of service and operates as a retail outlet. In Metro's case some of the gimmicks are giving away free pens (Barclays has been quietly doing that for some time in their branches), free dog biscuits and cash counting machines built to look like one arm bandits.

None of this is particularly new either in the US, the UK or the rest of the world. We have seen over the last decade or so banks attempting to become more like retail outlets whether it is the Abbey experiment with branches co-located with Costa Coffee outlets, which lent heavily on the experience of Washington Mutual with its co-located branches with Starbucks or the Australian branches with their offer of waxing your board while you are doing your banking. We've also seen banks recruiting senior executives from the retail sector to drive that retailing mindset into the branches. As tax payers no one should be allowed to forget the impact of having a retailer running Halifax Bank of Scotland had on that particular bank.

The point is that on the surface it may seem that a bank branch is just like any other retailer, but it only at the surface that that analogy works. When you go into a burger king to go to buy a standard product that is entirely disposable, highly commoditised and which you own for only a very short time. For a product such as this a bright, open plan store with little or no privacy is entirely appropriate. However opening a current account or a loan or a mortgage is nothing like a burger. Buying these types of products is a  long term, for many a life time, acquisition, intensely private (sharing how much you earn or are worth continues to be one of societies taboos that simply isn't going away) and are not quick purchases. So when you sit down in an open plan office, where the people on the street outside walking past can see the screen that the banker is operating as he types in your salary or looks at your overdraft, and the person at the desk next to you is ear-wigging on your conversation don't forget to ask whether your value added account comes with fries!