Showing posts with label PPI. Show all posts
Showing posts with label PPI. Show all posts

Tuesday, 21 August 2012

Free banking didn't cause misselling




With the UK Parliament about to launch a major review of standards in banking, there is much talk of free banking being one of the problems that led to poor behaviour by the lenders. However the two issues are quite separate and there is no evidence that shows the two items are related.

One of the primary reasons behind the PPI (Payments Protection Insurance) misselling scandal was that the banks began to believe that they were retailers. As a consequence they started hiring retailers into the banks, people who had no understanding of either banking or the essential values of banking. Many of these retailers came in from white goods retailers where the model is to sell a product, be it a fridge, a television or a camera, at a highly competitive, loss-making price and then make all the profit from selling them an extended warranty on the product at a very high price and with high confidence that the customer will never claim on the insurance because they'll either forget they have it, not understand how to claim on it or what happens to their product will not be covered by the insurance. In this retail model there is absolutely no need or desire to build a long term relationship with the customer.

This retail model was launched in retail banking whereby mortgages, personal loans and credit cards were 'sold' to customers as prices that the banks were not making any money on. This was because there was so much demand for credit that wholesale interest rates rose and so much competition for customers that retail prices fell. As a consequence if a bank wanted to be in the retail lending space they needed to find another way to make money and this is where the retailers told their 'not so smart' banking colleagues about the secret of their success - extended warranty. Of course no banker worth his salt could allow the customers to realise that banking is essentially a simple business, so a more obscure, erudite, confusing name for the product had to be created and hence PPI was born.

Getting rid of so-called free banking is not going to change the ways that bankers will look for new ways to make money; that has been a fundamental characteristic of banking since the industry began.

However there has been a recognition amongst most of the banks that trying to emulate the retailers was a failed experiment. Retail banking is not retailing. Mass retailing is anonymous and transactional, it is not about building a relationship, it is not about the long term. Gone are the coffee shops in banks, gone are the branches that look like retailers and gone, hopefully, is the pile 'em high, sell them cheap offers from the banks. What needs to be ensured is that culture does not return and that the leaders of the retail banks are led by people who have a deep foundation of retail banking and live the values required for long term relationships.

Monday, 12 March 2012

Why the culture of banks has to change



With the FSA (Financial Services Authority) report on what went wrong at HBOS (Halifax Bank of Scotland) before the bank had to be rescued by the UK Government and Lloyds TSB clearly showing that the issue was one of governance, there has never been a time when the need to change the culture of the banks has been clearer or more urgent.

The FSA report demonstrates that the corporate lending division of HBOS had a far riskier book than any of the other UK banks. HBOS continued to win deals in both the commercial and retail property markets in the UK, Ireland and Australia at lower margins and higher risks at a time when all the other banks were reducing their exposure to the sector or no longer pursuing new business. HBOS proudly proclaimed their success and growth in the market, not recognising that they alone were doing this. It doesn't appear to have crossed the minds of the executive that they were winning business that no one else wanted, or at least no one wanted at the rates that HBOS were offering. When the Head of the division proposed a growth of 10-12% in commercial lending not only was this not challenged he was told by the CEO of HBOS that this needed to be increased to 22%.

How could this situation have arisen?

The CEO of HBOS, Andy Hornby, had arrived at HBOS triumphantly from ASDA, part of the Walmart Group. With no background in Financial Services but having graduated top of his course at Harvard and having had a successful career with the strategy consultancy, Boston Consulting Group prior to ASDA, he was seen as the person who would shake up the sleepy financial services industry. He surrounded himself with people who agreed with his position. Those who didn't agree with him got short shrift. Benny Higgins (currently CEO of Tesco Financial Services), had joined from RBS, where he had had a very successful career, to lead the HBOS retail banking business. He left after only a very short while when he fell out with Andy Hornby over strategy.

What this meant was that no one was there to challenge the strategy and the decisions that the CEO of HBOS was taking. Not dissimilar to the situation that was described in the recent report on what went wrong with the corporate governance at RBSG under the leadership of Fred Goodwin.

It is undoubtedly for this reason that the FSA is asking for a change at the Co-operative if they wish to push ahead with the acquisition of the Verde branches from Lloyds Banking Group. The FSA are insisting that the board of the Co-op must have much more experience of Financial Services and be able to challenge the executive leadership of Co-operative Financial Services. This could be such a significant challenge for the Co-op to make them question whether they will continue to pursue the deal. Finding people who the FSA will approve to run or sit on the board of a bank is increasingly difficult. It took Tesco over two and half years to get approval to set up their bank. The FSA has an increasingly large backlog of people to be approved to work in senior roles for banks and it now takes months to get approvals for an individual, even if that individual has already been approved for a similar role at the bank or a rival bank. Such a delay in being able to pushed forward with Verde could make the deal so unattractive to the Co-op that they walk away from it. However given what went on at HBOS and RBSG it is not difficult to understand why the FSA is pushing for this.

The culture of banks where the CEO's and other executives' words are final and unchallengeable is not something new and has always been dangerous.

A recent example of this is the fine raised on RBSG for complaints. The fine was not for the poor service that RBSG was giving its customers but for the fact that the complaints received were modifed by staff before being submitted to the Banking Ombudsman. The reason given being that the staff were afraid of the consequences for their careers of the complaints being upheld. What does this say about the culture at RBSG today, many years after Fred Goodwin left?

A further example that illustrates why the culture needs to change is that of the misselling of PPI (Payment Protection Insurance). It was known throughout the banking industry that both personal loans and mortgages were being sold at prices below cost and subsidised by the excessively high margins on PPI policies, which were very hard to claim on. Yet because it was so profitable no one spoke out and the number of PPI policies that were sold grew exponentially. Why did no one speak out? Surely the hierarchical, command and control culture of the banks has to be key to this along with the pursuit of short term profits at the cost of the customer.

The £8.75m fine imposed on Coutts, owned by RBSG, for not putting in adequate measures to ensure that the money-laundering wasn't taking place or that they were doing business with PEPS (Politically Exposed Persons). One of the reasons cited by the FSA for this behaviour was that staff were incentivised to add additional customers and balances with no measure about the quality of the balances or the customers, is yet more evidence for the need for a fundamental shift in the culture enforced by alignment of incentives with the values that the banks should be upholding.

Without a fundamental change to the culture of banks, where both independent, experienced voices are listended to and encouraged to challenge the exexcutive of banks and with CEOs and senior executives who encourage their staff to challenge their thinking without fear of reprisals then another HBOS, PPI misselling or the latest misselling of derivatives to SMEs is inevitable.

Thursday, 5 May 2011

PPI - A sign of the mad, bad world

The announcement that Antonio Horta-Osorio, the new CEO of Lloyds Banking Group has decided to draw a line under the sorry PPI (Payment Protection Insurance) situation, take a reserve of £3.2bn and withdraw from the BBA (British Bankers' Association) appeal against the recent judgement should be welcomed as a sensible, pragmatic move and hopefully bring a close to the mad, bad world that was operating at the time that the misselling was taking place.

When the sale of PPI was at its peak the banks and finance houses were working in a market where personal loans were being sold at a loss as competition had driven the prices down and demand for funds driven the wholesale prices up. Banks and Finance Houses were prepared to sell these loans at a loss because they were able to sell Payment Protection Insurance at such a high premium, with very little chance of a claim against them due to the convoluted terms and conditions. Staff were heavily incentivised to sell PPI because that was where the profit came from and as a result hard-selling took place.

Consumers actually got loans at lower interest rates than they should have, so a good proportion of customers (primarily those who didn't take out PPI) were getting a good deal, so it wasn't all a terrible rip off for bank customers.

Hopefully the other banks and Finance Houses will follow the lead set by Lloyds Banking Group and draw this sorry episode to a halt. (UPDATE: All the other major banks have followed suit with RBSG writing off £850m, Santander £538m, Barclays £1bn and HSBC £270m or a total just under £6bn). That doesn't mean that everyone who claims should get their money back, because there are a surprisingly large number of claims being made by people who either didn't take out PPI or worse still didin't even take out a loan. The process of weeding out the fraudulent claims and processing the valid claims will undoubtedly take some time.

What should happen now is that loans and credit cards move to being priced realistically, based on the wholesale market prices and with a reasonable risk-adjusted price. This may be a shock to customers, but at least it will represent a fair price.

The fall out from the financial crisis is that retail banking needs to change, but the changes and expectations need to be not only on the banks' side but also the consumers.