Showing posts with label Westpac. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Westpac. Show all posts

Friday, 15 November 2013

The end of the COO/CIO experiment at Barclays?

The news that Shaygan Kheradpir, Chief Operations and Technology Officer, has resigned from Barclays to join Juniper Networks as CEO appears to mark the end of what was a brave experiment by the British bank. Back in January 2011 bringing in the former CTO from Verizon as COO of Barclays Retail and Business Bank was a surprising move given that Kheradpir had no apparent background in either banking or operations, let alone in the UK. HoweverKheradpir shook Barclays up from the start. Changing the historical relationship of CIOs reporting into COOs not only in Barclays but in banks and most other organisations across the world by making both equally accountable he made a bold statement. It’s a financial world wrote about this at the time http://www.itsafinancialworld.net/2011/05/barclays-cooscios-joined-at-hip.html . Whilst it was clear that not many banksagreed with this move (ANZ and WestPac being examplesthat went the opposite way), there was a lot of interest in seeing whether this radical change was going to make the difference to Barclays Retail and Business bank. This came at a time when Barclays’ investment bank, Barclays Capital, led by Bob Diamond and his close knit team were seen as aggressive, agile and highly successful; something that could not be said about the staid Barclays Retail and Business bank.  Kheradpir challenged the way that Barclays brought new ideas to market introducing agile and the first fruit of this approach was the launch of Pingit, the P2P payments solution.  He also brought in other like minded individuals from Verizon and those with a software background to reinforce the cultural change that he wanted to make. Following his early success, Kheradpir was promoted to Chief Operations and Technology Officer at the Group level and was responsible for driving the cost reduction elements of Antony Jenkins, the CEO of Barclays, ‘Transform’ programme. Much of which has yet to bear fruit.
Kheradpir leaving to go back to the Telco industry less than three years after he joined Barclays cannot be seen as a ringing endorsement for the effectiveness of bringing into a bank at such a senior level someone with no experience of the industry. Certainly there is an argument that bringing someone in from outside the industry brings a fresh perspective and enables them to ask the questions, just like the small boy in the story of the Emperor with no clothes that no one else dares to ask for fear of looking stupid. There is also the perspective, often argued by the consultants McKinsey that bringing someone in from another industry opens up the opportunity to leverage what worked well in that other industry. No one could honestly argue that banking doesn’t need to change. However banking and specifically retail banking in the UK has experimented with this before. The major banks hired retailers to teach them how to put the retail into retail banking. The ramifications of that are still being felt today. Yes bank branches may look smarter, may look more like GAP stores from the beginning of this century, but would there have been the PPI (Payments Protection Insurancemisselling scandal without those retailers for whom selling extended warranty policies which customers didn’t want or need was secondnature?
There is fundamentally nothing wrong with bringing in a senior executive from a different industry to challenge the way that things are done and have been done for many years, to argue for treating customers differently, to change the way that IT systems and change programmes are delivered but for this to succeed there are two critical requirements.
Firstly the new executive must not be so prejudiced or arrogant that they don’t listen and try to understand why the banking industry operates in the way that it does. That doesn’t mean that once they have taken the time to listen and to understand the industry that they apply their experience from outside the industry and fundamentally change the way that banking is delivered.
Secondly the new executive needs to surround him- or herself with open-minded experienced banking executives who he or she can rely upon for their integrity and to provide advice and a safe environment to allow the executive ask the dumb questions. The executive also needs to be confident that the executives working for him/her will tell them when they are talking rubbish. This sadly appears not to have happened in the run up to the financial crisis.
Kheradpir by making the COO and the CIO jointly responsible for the performance of the business units working for him was acknowledging that IT is not simply a supplier to the business of banking but that it is absolutely fundamental to being successful in banking. He was also recognising that today there are not that many banking executives out there that have the skills, experience and competencies to master both the COO and the CIO roles and therefore the next best step was to make them jointly accountable. Antony Jenkins, CEO of Barclays saw Kheradpir as one of the new generation of Renaissance COOs who are young enough to have been brought up with technology that it is so deeply ingrained in their DNA that the barriers between operations and IT can be effectively broken down by being encapsulated in one person.
With Shaygan Kheradpir moving to the CEO role at Juniper Networks the result of the experiment that Barclays undertook can only be inconclusive. Kheradpir simply will have not stayed long enough at Barclays to prove that the new model worked, whether it would have fundamentally changed the way that Barclays delivers banking which is a loss not only to Barclays but also to the banking industry that was watching with interest.

Friday, 18 May 2012

RBS forced to go down under for Retail Banking chief



RBS has announced that its new head of Retail Banking will be Ross McEwan. Despite the Scottish name, which undoubtedly is helpful at RBSG, Mr McEwan is from down under. He replaces Australian Brian Hartzer who is returning to his homeland to take up a similar role at Westpac (see http://www.itsafinancialworld.net/2011/11/wanted-ceo-for-uk-retail-bank.html ). It is not only native Australians that are making the journey down under, but there has been a flood of banking executives working in the UK who have decided to up sticks and move to the Southern Hemisphere (see http://www.itsafinancialworld.net/2012/01/trickle-becomes-flood-as-bankers-leave.html ).

Whilst a number of UK banking executives were approached and interviewed for the role that Ross McEwan will fill none of them were interested. This has to raise the question why? Certainly for executives with successful careers at banks free of government shareholdings such as HSBC and Santander there are clear reasons why a move to RBSG may hold little appeal. Given the turgid time Stephen Hester has had with his compensation and personal life discussed very publicly in the press and in Parliament to the point where even he considered resigning, why would anyone put themselves into that position when they don't need to? With the level of government implicit and explicit interference in the running of RBSG, there have to be better places to work. For the ambitious executive who sees heading Retail Banking at RBS as a career stepping stone the question is what would be the move after that? Almost certainly not into the CEO role of one of the UK banks as RBSG is a damaged brand and there are no obvious CEO roles coming up at the UK banks in the next few years. The probability is, as evidenced by Brian Hartzer, that the next move after heading up Retail Banking at RBSG would most likely be a CEO role in Australia. Not all UK banking executives or their families would see that as attractive.

With the Vickers ICB (Independent Commission on Banking)  recommendations coming into law including the ring-fencing of retail banking, the increased scutiny of bankers' compensation and the antagonistic attitude of British politicians towards bankers, the UK Government has made a career in UK banking very unattractive. For the state-backed banks, RBSG and Lloyds Banking Group, this has been made even more unattractive which means that these organisations are finding it even more difficult to attract top talent. The time it has taken for Lloyds Banking Group to find a replacement for Truett Tate, the head of Wholesale Banking is just one example of this.

Yet it needs to be recognised that to turn around these banks top talent is needed because these are some of the toughest challenges.

RBSG and Lloyds Banking Group are not alone in struggling to hire and retain top talent, it appears that having recruited Rumi Contractor from HSBC to become the UK Retail  and Business Banking COO in January that they have already parted company.

With HSBC CEO Stuart Gulliver suggesting that, with the increased cost of conducting retail banking, that pulling out of the UK is a real possibility, resulting in significant layoffs, reducing the number of  quality UK banking executives dramatically, there is a serious threat to the sector.

For the UK to retain its position as one of the key the Financial Services centres of the world, the sector needs to be able to attract the right talent. This is critical to the recovery of the UK economy. Isn't it about time that the politicians took the lead and put an end to the relentless bashing of the banks?

Thursday, 24 November 2011

Barclays COOs/CIOs joined at the hip? ANZ doesn't agree

In an interesting move Barclays Global Retail Banking COO, Shaygan Kheradpir, has announced that the COO and CIO of each of the business units within the Global Retail Bank ( Barclaycard, UK Retail Banking, Barclays Africa and Western Europe) will jointly run their businesses and report to their CEO as well as to the GRB COO. This is sending a very clear message that, for retail banking, IT is as important as operations and that only by jointly working together can they succeed.

One can only assume that this is a move to change the behaviour often seen in banks where IT is seen as the whipping boy of Operations, the department that holds back the business from evolving and competing and the recipient of a lot of finger pointing.

In many banks and other financial services organisations IT reports into Operations and is not represented on the Executive Committees of their business units. This move by Barclays firmly places IT at the top table. It represents just how much more banks are dependent upon IT to be competitive.

Commonwealth Bank has gone one step further and has their CIOs reporting directly to the CEO, such do they see the significance of technology to the success of their banks.

Too often recently there have been tales of how IT has stopped the business working. You only have to look at the woes that National Australia has been enduring and the impact on the business of systems not working.
See http://www.itsafinancialworld.net/2011/04/deja-vu-as-nab-systems-down-once-again.html Interestingly NAB has a structure whereby they have split responsibility for IT between effectively BAU (Business As Usual) and New Technology with Adam Bennett as CIO and Christine Bartlett, the executive programme director of the NextGen technology upgrade programme.

However Barclays is clearly demonstrating how technology can help lead a business. First out with the tap and wave debit card in the UK and first out in the UK with the mobile wallet on a phone with their joint venture with Orange (see http://www.uswitch.com/news/communications/orange-and-barclaycard-launch-mobile-phone-payment-scheme-800550966/ )

For this joint responsibility to work effectively requires a special type of COO and a special type of CIO. The head of Operations will need to have far more than just an appreciation of IT than has traditionally been the case. Equally the CIO will need to have a deep understanding of how the business works and how IT can enable the bank to compete. Traditional CIOs who have come from an IT Service Delivery, focussed on keeping the lights on, may struggle to perform this role. The type of CIO required for banks is clearly evolving. This is discussed further at http://www.itsafinancialworld.net/2011/10/new-type-of-cio-is-required-for-todays.html
This dual leadership can only be seen as a temporary measure until enough executives emerge who can really master both banking and technology - people like Shaygan Kheradpir, whose last role was CTO at Verizon, and is an example of the Renaissance Man which is needed to manage banks in the 21st century.

In a move against the trend ANZ has announced that Anne Weatherston the CIO will no longer report directly to the CEO, Mike Smith, but will now report to Alistair Currie, the new COO, whilst still retaining her position on the management committee.

Shortly after the ANZ announcement Westpac has followed suit in going against the trend and has announced that they will not only introduce one COO but two and have a CIO reporting into each one, removing the CIO responsibilities even further from the CEO and the board.

Only time will tell whether either ANZ's and Westpac's or Barclays' and CBA's models are right. It will be interesting to see and costly for the banks that have got it wrong.

Friday, 14 October 2011

HSBC goes back to its roots

HSBC announced its return to its roots as a bank that supports international trade in the strategy announcement on May 11th. Stuart Gulliver, the new CEO and former investment banker, has firmly changed the emphasis back to becoming 'the leading international bank concentrating on Commercial and Wholesale banking in globally connected markets'.



Stuart Gulliver

Whilst the words may be modern, this is what the bank was first set up for in Hong Kong in 1865. Supporting international trade alongside the Taipan at Jardines. 'globally connected markets' are the twenty first century words for what is essentially trade routes, though expanded beyond commodities and goods to include money. So when you look at the US and Mexico or Germany and Turkey, as well as the large amount of trade flowing, you see large quantities of money flowing across borders sent by entrepreneurial immigrants back to their families, the strategic value of being in these geographies makes abundant sense.

'Becoming the world's leading international private bank' is also a return to the original roots. Support the international trading companies and support their owners - again what the original HSBC was set up to do for the taipans living on The Peak. In addition with the focus on Wealth Management HSBC is ensuring that as the entrepreneurs acquire their wealth there is a route to climb up to the exclusivity of the Private Bank.

The real change of focus is on 'limiting retail banking to those markets where we can achieve profitable scale', but who can argue with the cold logic of that? What it does mean is that questions are undoubtedly being asked as to whether the use of the strapline that has been so successful and has won so many awards, 'The World's local bank',  will still be valid, unless of course your definition of 'the world' is restricted to the number of focus countries, considerably less than the 80+ countries that HSBC currently operates in.
With the announcement of the sale of its Hungarian retail banking operations to Cofidis Magyarorszagi Fioktelepe, the sale to Itau (the Brazilian bank) of its Chilean retail operation and discussions underway for the sale of its small (11 branch) South Korean retail bank, the strategy of withdrawal is in full execution.

However it is not all about withdrawal. In Australia HSBC has opened its 31st retail branch as it builds its presence there. Whilst there is an increasingly large and affluent Asian population which HSBC will be attractive to it is difficult to understand how this fits in with HSBC's strategy to focus on markets where it can grow a significant presence given the dominance of the 'Four Pillars' - Nab, CBA, ANZ and Westpac in Australia. 

HSBC has clearly made some diversions from its original path along the 146 years that it has been running, not least of all the move into the subprime market with the acquisition of Household in the US (the remains of which is now subject to review and may results in the selling of all or part of the cards and retail banking businesses), but it is to be welcomed the statement of intent to move to a 21st century version of what it was originally set up for.


Wednesday, 4 May 2011

Why the Big 5 banks should be pushing for the end of 'free banking' (and the government shouldn't)

With the ICB (Independent Commission on Banking) looking at increasing competition in the retail banking sector, examining the market share of the big banks and overall looking for greater fairness and transparency in charging, strongly supported by the likes of Vince Cable and other politicians, increasingly it looks as if the end of 'free banking' is in sight. Of course 'free banking' doesn't really exist, rather it is a mirage in that rather than paying directly for the services provided, consumers are made to pay by low or no interest rates for money deposited in current accounts, low interest rates in deposit accounts, high mortgage rates and even higher overdraft charges. As consumers baulk at the costs charged for loans and going overdrawn and politicians continually call for fairer, transparent charges, the inevitable conclusion is a banking system where customers pay for the services they use.

Being able to charge a direct amount for the services they provide would bring some significant advantages to the big banks in the heavily regulated environment that they are increasingly operating in. When there is more focus on the market share that each of the banks has, and where more market share is seen as bad, then the banks will want to focus not on the absolute market share but the quality of the market share.

All of the big banks today have customers that they don't make any money from. These will be the types of customers that open a current account for their household money, for their book club, for their children, where the balances are low, transactions sizes are small and they have only one product. If market share is going to be restricted then these are the customers that the banks are going to want to be shot of. The problem is that in today's banking environment it is very difficult for a bank to fire customers. However if customers were made to pay directly for the services that they use then it would be far easier for the banks to adjust their charges to either makes the low balance/low transaction value customers profitable or, better still for the banks, to encourage those customers to take their business elsewhere.

With four out of the five big banks now being run by investment bankers not retail bankers, and Barclays, HSBC and Lloyds Banking Group focussed on a strategy of raising their Return on Equity (ROE) up to at least the 14-15% range, then there is clear evidence that making customers pay directly for the services they use can help achieve this. In Australia where this model has existed for many years, The 'Four Pillars' (National Australia, Commonwealth Bank, WestPac and ANZ), have in the past enjoyed ROEs of 20+%. Even with tougher regulation they are each expecting ROEs of around 16%, significantly higher than any of the UK banks.

However whilst this all sounds very attractive for the big banks, it is not great for the new entrants, who will struggle to compete with the scale advantages that will allow the big banks to make their charges attractive for the customers they want. It also raises the big question of who will provide the banking services to the customers that the big banks don't want? It has the potential to significantly increase the number of the unbanked. As the likes of Vince Cable continue their crusade against the banks and push for ever more transparency of charging for banking services, the politicians need to be wary of the consequences of getting what they wish for.

Wednesday, 9 February 2011

Joy Griffiths leaves Lloyds Banking Group

It has been officially announced that Joy Griffiths, Managing Director of the Lloyds TSB and Bank of Scotland Community Banks, i.e. head of the retail bank for the two brands, is leaving Lloyds Banking Group to become Managing Director of  Experian Decision Analytics.

This is a real loss to both Lloyds Banking Group and to Retail Banking. Joy has a fantastic pedigree in Retail Banking from her time at Westpac in New Zealand and Australia through Wells Fargo to running Cheltenham & Gloucester and finally running both the Lloyds TSB and Bank of Scotland franchises. Joy is one of the few banking executives who has seen success across Asia, America and the UK and therefore has tremendous insight into what world class retail banking looks like. She is also that rare retail banking executive that has a deep technology background and knows how to leverage technology effectively. The retail banking industry will be poorer for her not being in it.

Lloyds Banking Group will be worse off for not having her as part of the executive team.

Undoubtedly Joy will not be the last executive to leave the Group given the change of CEO and the uncertainty hanging over Lloyds pending the outcome of the Independent Commission on Banking.

I wish Joy every success in her new and exciting challenge at Experian.