Showing posts with label Williams & Glyn. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Williams & Glyn. Show all posts

Wednesday, 21 January 2015

Why 2015 won't be the year of the challenger bank


When politicians and consumer finance champions talk about challenger banks they are looking for new players to eat into the 77% of the current account market and the 85% of the small business banking market that the Big 5 (Barclays, Lloyds, HSBC, RBS and Santander) currently have.

The figures from the Financial Conduct Authority for potential new banks could give the impression that 2015 could be the year that finally the Big 5 sees their market share being significantly reduced:

6 banking licences issued
4 banks proceeding through the application process
26 new banks being discussed

In addition there are already the likes of Nationwide, Co-op, TSB, Yorkshire Bank, Clydesdale Bank, Metro Bank, One Savings Bank, Handelsbanken, Aldermore, M&S Bank, Tesco Bank, Virgin Money and Shawbrook operating in the UK.

However on closer scrutiny the picture isn't quite as rosy and is unlikely to cause any executive from the Big 5 banks to lose any sleep.

The existing “challengers” broadly fall into one of four camps.

Camp 1: Existing established Players:

Nationwide

Co-op

Yorkshire Bank

Clydesdale Bank

Post Office (Bank of Ireland)

The established players have been operating current accounts in the UK market for many years, Nationwide being the newest of these to this specific market. Despite having been in the market for some time these established players’ impact on the market share of the Big 5 has been minimal. Nationwide is the most proactive in trying to acquire new customers within this group as is reflected by their being one of the biggest beneficiaries since the introduction of 7 Day Switching. Their market share is small but growing and its offering is something that clearly appeals to customers who do not like the Big 5 banks.

Camp 2: Banks created from former banks:

One Savings Bank (Kent Reliance Building Society)

TSB (Lloyds Banking Group)

Virgin Money (Northern Rock)

Williams & Glyn (RBS) – still to be launched

These are all banks that have (or will) relaunch themselves and have existing customers, branches and IT infrastructure. What this means is that in terms of offering a true alternative to the Big 5 banks they are limited by the legacy technology and cost bases they have inherited when they were set up. In the case of TSB and Williams & Glyn both of these were compulsory disposals by their parent banks following the 2008 financial crisis, however both of them have significant shareholdings by Lloyds Bank Group (TSB) and RBS (Williams & Glyn) so whether they can really be seen as challengers when they are still owned by one of the Big 5 is questionable.

One Savings Bank does not offer a current account and is focused on the specialty lending sector. Virgin Money does not currently market a current account.

Camp 3: Banks owned by larger organisations

Handelsbanken

Tesco Bank

M&S Bank

These three are each quite different.

Handelsbanken which has more than 175 branches in the UK has its parent company in Sweden. It is primarily focused on SME banking but does offer a personal current account. It is building a presence and has very high customer satisfaction but is still sufficiently subscale to not be a threat to the market share of the Big 5. However it is picking off customers that the Big 5 banks would rather not lose.

Tesco Bank has only relatively recently launched its current account so it is difficult to judge how successful it will be. With the size of the Tesco customer base and the insight it has into its customers from the Clubcard it has the potential to be a serious challenger however achieving sufficient scale will be beyond 2015. There is also a possibility with the woes of Tesco that the bank could be a candidate for disposal which could change significantly Tesco Bank’s market position.

M&S Bank while it does offer current accounts cannot be seen as a challenger as it is owned by HSBC, one of the Big 5 Banks. 

Camp 4: Greenfield challenger banks

Metro Bank

Aldermore

Shawcross

Atom Bank

Charter Savings Bank

Hampden & Co

These (and there are more) are the genuine upstarts the ones that are doing or planning to do something different in the market. The last three are still to launch. They are all primarily Private Equity funded.

Of those listed on Metro Bank offers a personal current account and Atom has a stated intention to offer one.

What each of these Greenfield challengers does not offer is scale and will certainly not bother the Big 5 banks in 2015.

Big 5 bank executives can sleep easy in 2015
When an examination is made across the four Camps as described above the inevitable conclusion is that while there may be some headlines and excitement about the number of potential challengers in and coming into the UK banking market there can be no doubt that in 2015 there will be very little dent in the current account market share of the Big 5 banks.

Thursday, 12 June 2014

Tesco Bank launches a current account - finally!

The news that Tesco Bank has finally launched its current/checking account six years after its split from RBS was announce must come as a great relief to Benny Higgins, CEO, and the rest of the team at Tesco Bank. Like expectant fathers they have been pacing the corridors of the maternity ward far longer than they would have liked. The delays have been numerous but principally down to getting over the regulatory hurdles and, more recently, ensuring that the IT systems fully work the way that they are meant to before being unleashed on real customers. Delaying the launch of the current account until the systems were thoroughly tested, while it was frustrating for those anxious to see Tesco Bank becoming a real challenger to the sector, should be recognised as absolutely the right decision for the CEO to take. The embarrassment and reputational damage caused to banks such as RBS and National Australia from having serious outages in their core banking systems far outweighs the benefits of launching earlier.

The announced current account is paying 3% on balances and only charging a monthly account fee of £5 if less than £750 is paid into the account. This is a competitive offer. There are added advantages for Tesco customers who will also receive loyalty Clubcard Points on all spending using the Tesco debit card.

Marks & Spencer beat Tesco out with a current account, having both free and fee-charging versions of their accounts. As with Tesco there will be benefits of being both a customer of M&S and its bank in terms of rewards. There will be some overlap between customers but the big difference is that Marks & Spencer Bank is owned by HSBC and therefore cannot really be seen as a challenger bank.

The launch of the current account by Tesco Bank should represent a real challenge to the big five banks (Barclays, Lloyds, HSBC, RBS and Santander). As an aside, Santander likes to position itself as a challenger but being owned by one of the largest banking groups in the world, coming from the consolidation of building societies (Abbey National, Alliance & Leicester, Bradford & Bingley being the main ones) and with a less than perfect reputation for the service it provides it quite rightly deserves to be clumped in with the other big 4 banks as being just another legacy bank.

There are many reasons why Tesco Bank should be seen as a real challenge to the established players. For starters it is not a small bank – it already has over 6 million customers using its insurance and lending products. All of these customers are potential customers for their current account offering. It also already has a large physical distribution network through its supermarkets. As they are available to savers today customers will be able to make deposits in 300 stores. However this account has been designed to be opened online and customer support will be available on the phone. The bank being designed for digital differentiates it from the likes of TSB, Metro Bank, Virgin Money and Williams & Glyn, which have all come from a traditional branch centric design.

Not only has Tesco Bank been designed from the start with digital in mind, Tesco also has many years experience of running large scale digital operations through its own website as well as operations like Tesco Mobile. This gives it a much better chance of delivering a reliable good customer experience than other challenger banks, particularly the small scale contenders such as Metro Bank, Aldermore and Atom.

Tesco Bank also has the added advantage that through its Clubcard programme it not only has vast amounts of data on both its existing and potential customers but it also has years and years of experience of using that data to drive business. Unlike the new start ups and the established banks so-called ‘Big’ data is not a new topic for Tesco. This should give it significant advantages given its customer insight in terms of providing customised propositions to its customers.

Tesco Bank is also not weighed down by legacy. They don’t have the reputational problems from the mis-selling of PPI and the high levels of complaints which the Big Five banks have. They can position themselves as truly a new entrant. While TSB and Williams & Glyn may have the liability for the past retained by their parents (Lloyds and RSB respectively) many of the executives who made the decisions to sell PPI, set the aggressive targets and the staff who delivered them are working for these ‘challenger’ banks.

They are also not weighed down by legacy systems unlike the Big Five banks, those spawned from the Big Five (TSB and Williams & Glyn) and those challenger banks who have been created by the acquisition of former building societies such as One Savings Bank (Kent Reliance Building Society) and Virgin Money (Northern Rock). While it may have taken Tesco Bank longer to get to market with their current account it is being delivered on (at least relatively) modern systems.

What the launch of Tesco Bank’s current account means is that there are now two sizeable challenger banks that are not tainted with the legacy of the financial crisis and that are serving their customers using modern technology platforms designed to work in the digital mobile world – Nationwide and Tesco.

Does this mean that the Big Five banks are quaking in their boots worried about their future? Clearly any bank executive should be aware of and taking into account what the competition is doing. The reality though is that for most customers banking is not that interesting, it is a commodity not worth spending a lot of time thinking about and that despite Seven Day Switching making it easier, they have better things to do with their time than switch bank accounts. This means that there will not be a flood of customers leaving the Big Five banks to sign up with Tesco or Nationwide.

The launch of the Tesco Bank current account is to be welcomed as a new force in the retail banking market, but no one should think that this is going to bring about a seismic change to who customers bank with.

Wednesday, 28 May 2014

New NAB CEO faces challenge of what to do with Yorkshire and Clydesdale Banks


With Cameron Clyne leaving National Australia to spend more time with his family, incoming Group CEO, Andrew Thorburn, will have to face the perennial question of what to do with the bank’s UK businesses. For many years Yorkshire Bank and Clydesdale Bank have been seen as albatrosses hanging around the neck of the incumbent Group CEO of National Australia. With Nab’s focus on growing in their domestic market and Asia the two banks have long been seen as non-strategic.

During the financial crisis Nab had to invest nearly £1.5bn of capital into the business to shore up the balance sheet. There have been challenges with non performing loans as well as redress for misselling of PPI to add to the woes. As part of a plan to improve the performance of the business there has been a significant cost cutting exercise that resulted in the removal of 1,400 jobs and the closure of 29 banking centres. There has also been a withdrawal from London and the south of England.
However for many years both banks have been starved of any significant investment to improve them and to make them better able to compete in the UK market. It is not since the Brit John Stewart was Group CEO and fellow Brit Lynne Peacock was running the UK operations that any significant effort was put into innovation and growing the businesses in the UK. Indeed large parts of the strategy for the UK banks set out by Stewart and Peacock were reversed during the cost cutting exercise. (Recent news that Clydesdale Bank is to issue Britain’s first plastic £5 note hardly counts as innovation).
Nab in Melbourne have for a long time been very open about the fact that Yorkshire Bank and Clydesdale Bank are seen as non-strategic. The market has been sounded out for interest in acquiring the business. At one point it was rumoured that Santander was interested in acquiring the business but no deal has emerged. A key on-going challenge for the Nab Group CEO has been that there has been a significant gap between the value that the UK operations are held on the balance sheet and the price potential acquirers are prepared to pay. This situation has deteriorated even further since the crisis in 2008 with both bank valuations dropping and the interest in acquiring banks disappearing. For Nab, either no  Group CEO wanted to take that write off on their watch or the Board wouldn’t let him.
There is no doubt that there has been and continues to be a lot of dissatisfaction from analysts and investors about the financial performance of Nab in its local domestic market. It is seen as the laggard of the Four Pillars. The challenge for Andrew Thorburn is to turn around that perception. Whilst the UK operations are definitely not the highest priority in terms of fixing the business they are seen both as a distraction and requiring significant capital that could be better deployed elsewhere.
So as Andrew Thorburn starts his role as CEO in August 2014, will he do something to resolve this issue and what are his options for the UK operations?
The ideal outcome for the new CEO would be to sell the UK operations and minimise the write off. The question though is who would want to buy them?
On paper Yorkshire Bank and Clydesdale Bank could be challenger banks. They both have strong brands with loyal customers. The Yorkshire brand stretches way beyond the county boundaries. Clydesdale is seen very much as a Scottish bank and one that has managed to maintain its reputation far better than either Royal Bank of Scotland or HBoS, its two main rivals. This could make it attractive to Private Equity firms, for instance JC Flowers might wish to merge it with its OneSavings Bank. It could also be attractive to other Private Equity firms looking to establish a foothold in the UK retail banking market. However the timing for One Savings Bank is not good as they have already announced that they are to float and that is where their focus in the short term will be.
The challenge for anyone evaluating Yorkshire and Clydesdale is, apart from their customer base, what is there of value to acquire? Between the Yorkshire and Clydesdale they have 322 branches, a very similar number to the branches that Williams & Glyn (the challenger bank being created from the forced disposal RBS has to make) will have. However, as is becoming increasingly apparent to both established and challenger banks, the use of branches by customers is declining and therefore the value of having an extensive network of branches is reducing. As both RBS and Lloyds found out finding buyers for their branches was not easy with both, respectively, Santander and Co-op withdrawing their offers after long protracted negotiations. The additional challenge with the Yorkshire and Clydesdale branches is that significant investment by the buyer would be required to bring the branches up to  a standard customers expect today due to the lack of investment by Nab over the last few years.
If a new entrant was looking to acquire the Nab UK operations and they wanted to initially use the Nab IT platforms then if they wish to be competitive they would need to invest very heavily over the medium term on new platforms, as the Nab platforms are old and in need of retiring.
With a cost income ratio of 76% there is a lot of efficiency gains to be driven out by the right owner, but the question is the level of investment to achieve this and over what time period.
Given the level of investment that any new entrant would need to make in order to use the UK operations as a platform for competing in the UK retail banking market, the price that they would be prepared to offer is highly unlikely to meet the amount sitting on the Nab balance sheet.
Given Nab’s situation it is easy to understand why a couple of years ago Santander were rumoured to be interested in acquiring the UK operations. Santander has its own platform, Partnenon, and has a track record of being able to migrate bank accounts onto its systems – Abbey National, Alliance & Leicester and Bradford & Bingley. The challenge for Nab is that Santander is a distress purchaser and never knowingly overpays.
If Nab can’t sell Yorkshire and Clydesdale at an acceptable price then what about a flotation? Timing is a real challenge here as there has never been a time when more banks are coming onto the market. TSB, Aldermore, OneSavings Bank,William & Glyn, Virgin Money, Metro and Shawbrook have all announced intentions to come to the market over the next eighteen months. Investors are spoilt for choice. Along with the recent disappointing flotations (Saga, JustEat. AO, etc), albeit in other sectors, there will be a downward pressure on prices and consequently the amount of capital that will be raised.
Another option is to do nothing and let the two brands continue to operate as they are today, continue to reduce costs and improve performance with minimal investment and allow the business to slowly decline as customers move away to competitors when they are attracted by better offers.
There is no immediate need for Andrew Thorburn to make a decision about the future of the UK operations particularly given the uncertainty with the Scottish Referendum occurring in September 2014. The UK operations operate under a Scottish banking licence and a ‘Yes’ vote could create a long period of uncertainty and have a significant impact on the value of the UK operations.
However as a new CEO there is a grace period during which there is an opportunity as the new broom to look with fresh eyes at all the problems. It is an opportunity to announce write offs, set the bar and expectations low and then over-perform. Thorburn should take full advantage of this initial period of goodwill to be quite clear what his plan is for Yorkshire and Clydesdale to end the uncertainty for customers, colleagues and investors.